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 Post subject: Can you help me?
PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 5:37 am 
I need program notes of about 1800 words for the following works
Bach/Busoni - Chaconne in D minor
Schubert - Sonata in C minor D958
Beethoven - Sonata in C op.2, no.3
Faure - Nocturneno.4, op.36
Chopin - Etudes no.3 & no.12, op.10

The notes should contain the following details:
background of pieces, composer's intentions, context of work in composer's life, details of commission, the process of composition and first performance, general musical trends of the era, influences on the composer, structure of the works, etc.

Can you please help me? or can you atleast suggest where i can get such information?

Thank You


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 10:20 am 
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Location: Netherlands
Where to get such information, hmmmm......
Have you tried the Internet yet ?

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 02, 2006 7:26 pm 
or hmm... piano society.com!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2006 1:51 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2006 4:18 pm
Posts: 305
Location: damwoude
try wikipedia.

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music is enough for lifetime but lifetime isn't enough for music 'rachmaninoff'

while composing I've got always an picture in my head 'beethoven'


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2006 5:27 pm 
Hello there :D

I agree with all of the options that had been given above.

Wikipedia is also really good, but some of the information that has been given are not enough. There are lots of sites in the internet that can help you with your Program notes.

Good Luck! :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2006 6:03 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2006 4:29 pm
Posts: 170
Location: Ede, Netherlands
I found this for you...:

Quote:
(from Wikipedia):
Chopin Etudes op. 10:

No. 3 in E major
A slow cantabile study, in which the right hand must maintain a singing tone in the melody whilst contributing to the accompaniment. It is intended to be played together with No.4 - the score indicates an attacca from one to the other. Of this piece Chopin said, "In all of my life I have never been able to find again so beautiful a melody."

No. 12 in c minor
Étude in C minor, op. 10 no. 12, known as The Revolutionary Étude, is a solo piano work by Frédéric Chopin written circa 1831. It is the 12th of his first set of etudes - "Douze Grandes Etudes" dedicated to "son ami Franz Liszt" (his friend Franz Liszt). The two sets of Études, Opus 10 and 25, are known collectively as the Chopin Études, although Chopin also contributed three other lesser known études.

Unlike études of prior periods (works designed to emphasize and develop particular aspects of musical technique, cf the much feared but essential School of Velocity,[1] or the Five Finger Exercises by Hanon[2]) the romantic études of composers such as Chopin and Liszt are fully developed musical concert pieces, but retain the stylistic goal of emphasizing development of particular piano techniques.

In the case of The Revolutionary Étude, the technique required in the opening bars is playing an extremely fast, long and loud descending harmonic minor scale. What makes it an étude and not just a stylistic element that might be found in any piece is length and repetition.

Another technique developed is cross-rhythms which are used with increasing sophistication to handle the same theme in various successive parallel passages.

The étude appeared around the same time as the Russian takeover of Warsaw in 1831. Chopin was unable to take an active part in the uprising due to his physical frailty and instead poured his emotions on the matter into many pieces that he composed at that time - the most notable being the Revolutionary Étude.

The left hand technique involved in this piece involves evenly played rapid passages throughout (Kamien 231). The basic form is a strophic coda form (A A'). The opening broken chords (diminished chord with an added passing note) and downward passages transition into the main appassionato melody. The octave melody's dotted rhythms and the continuous accompaniment creates tension. At the end of the A' section, the coda provides somewhat of a rest from that tension and then the work recalls the opening in a final descending sweep leading to the final closing chords. (Kamien 232)

Beethoven's Piano Sonata No. 3 in C major is the third sonata of a set of three from his Opus 2 publication. It dates from 1796, three years prior to his groundbreaking Pathétique Sonata. It consists of four movements and lasts about 24 minutes:

*Allegro con brio
*Adagio
*Scherzo (allegro)
*Allegro assai
The sonata is often referred as Beethoven's first virtuosic piano sonata. The opening notes of the allegro con brio clearly fail at controlling the chipperness that is this movement's ethos. The adagio is particularly emotive with its sweet melody followed by a clearly-pedalled minor key section. Likewise, the scherzo also buffers a heavily-pedalled minor key section with more spritely parts. The final allegro assai movement is a pleasant showcase with upward runs, trills, and some minor key drama.






Btw, post no. 100, Yay :lol: !

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Yiteng

"Without music, life would be a mistake."
Friedrich Nietzsche


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2006 6:20 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 12, 2006 11:45 am
Posts: 9479
Location: Netherlands
Quote:
Btw, post no. 100, Yay :lol: !

Ok, you win. Power Poster Rides Again :roll:

But seriously, all good intentions aside, doing people's homework for them (like Googling up stuff they are too lazy to do for themselves) is a bit of a waste of time. Don't become everybody's gopher.

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Nothing is always absolutely so -- Sturgeon's law
Chris Breemer


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2006 7:38 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2006 12:38 pm
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techneut wrote:
But seriously, all good intentions aside, doing people's homework for them (like Googling up stuff they are too lazy to do for themselves) is a bit of a waste of time. Don't become everybody's gopher.


You have a good heart, lol_nl, but I have to agree with techneut. You're doing too much work for someone else. Shouldn't you be practicing your Hanon and Czerny? hee, hee.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 22, 2006 9:11 am 
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Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2006 4:18 pm
Posts: 305
Location: damwoude
there are alot of people who can't handle Internet. Maybe is thokky someone who can't. I think that she can ask this sort of questions on this forum. There are no stupid questions only stupid answers.

gr.

robert

_________________
music is enough for lifetime but lifetime isn't enough for music 'rachmaninoff'

while composing I've got always an picture in my head 'beethoven'


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2006 12:42 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2006 4:29 pm
Posts: 170
Location: Ede, Netherlands
Quote:
Quote:
Btw, post no. 100, Yay :lol: !

Ok, you win. Power Poster Rides Again :roll:

But seriously, all good intentions aside, doing people's homework for them (like Googling up stuff they are too lazy to do for themselves) is a bit of a waste of time. Don't become everybody's gopher.


So there follows a damn long reply here (please read it):

What's your purpose, giving comments on everything someone else does? I agree that the guy could've done the searching himself, but I did it for him, so what?

Only because the "Btw, post no. 100, Yay :lol: !" you give comments on my post? Would you post the same question when I didn't add that piece of text? I don't think you would write "Ok, you win. Power Poster Rides Again :roll: " if I didn't write that it's my 100th post.

And more important, why would you spend your time correcting my post that you think is somehow inappropiate or not useful or whatever? That's a waste of time as well. You could've just PM'ed me. What's the purpose of spending your time correcting me? Do to tell the rest not to follow my example? Or do you just want more posts, which would be ridiculous?

But my main point is why am I here more likely to recieve comments that somehow tell me that I spam or post unnecessary posts? I always have a good intention. I am willing to help others, to contribute something to this forum. So are other people at other forums, they want to help each other, and believe me, I have seen more people who do other people's homework, and some even more literary, by writing an own article. And what did they get? No negative comments that they were doing unnecessary work, but they got praised for their job. Of course some people said that the work he did could be done by the original poster himself, but still they show more respect. You might think that those other forums are other forums, and this forum has nothing to do with other forums. But still, do you know that many people have left this forum because they didn't like the way people treated other?
And that's something I wanted to make clear. This single comment you had is maybe very small, but it's just those small details that people are looking at. Once again, I totally agree with your comment, the guy could've done it himself, but disapproving every post like this gives this forum a bad reputation. I will try to remember what you said, but I can't promise that the next time I won't post something like copying something else from other websites. At many other forums they say that this forum is a great forum but the some people here are not very nice to each other, and that's why they left. My purpose is not to publically offense all people here, but just reminding some of the people here that this forum might have a better reputation when people respect each other more. That doesn't mean that all people should praise each other for every single thing someone does, that would be very unnecessary. No, respect is something else.

I understand that this forum has more older people, and that the others contain more teenagers and young people in their 20s, but does that mean that everything which is just a bit inappropiate or not very suitable, like helping each other in cases the person could've done it him/herself, for this forum should get corrections and disappeciation?

People get the impression that it's not permitted to have fun here. I remeber one of my first posts in the old forum, just asking about what age the people were. And that wasn't very well recieved. I remember that someone wrote that this has nothing to do with piano. That's true, but do you think piano forums are designed just for serious discussion? Don't you think it's important for the people who post here to know each other? It feels just like posting as a robot and getting robot replies. I still don't know much about any of the people here. We can use MSN for that, you might think? Yes we could, but do you think most people want to MSN with others they don't know? I wouldn't really like to, and for me, it would be better to first know about another person before MSNing with that person.

All I gave was 1 single example, but I hope that's clear enough to get my point of view.

And finally, it would be really stupid if you delete this post, because this whole thing is something that I wanted to make clear to the people who post here. I hope people will change into more polite and respect each other more after they notice what others think about them.
Sorry for the long and messy post, which maybe includes unnecessary repetitions. I'm sure I didn't write about several things that are very important, but maybe I'll add some when I remember that. My main point is not to comment on that single post (actually maybe I even agree with the post) but more to say something that might change this forum in general a bit. I lost track how long I've been busy with this.. maybe this post is somewhat unnecessary after all.. :roll:

_________________
Yiteng

"Without music, life would be a mistake."
Friedrich Nietzsche


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2006 12:58 pm 
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Site Admin

Joined: Mon Jun 12, 2006 11:45 am
Posts: 9479
Location: Netherlands
Hey, that was indeed a long and very articulate post. Good you got it off your chest !

I was just having some fun with that remark, don't feel offended. If I really wanted to criticize or worse, you'd be in no doubt at all about my intention :wink:

We know you mean well. If you enjoy googling up things for every tom, dick and harry who can't take that incentive himself, by all means do it ! Personally, I would just send them the link (www.google.com) but then I'm a lazy old sod....

Pace.

_________________
Nothing is always absolutely so -- Sturgeon's law
Chris Breemer


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jul 26, 2006 6:02 am 
I agree with techneut that thokky should do his own research. But thokky, I'll follow lol_nl's example and give you a link here: http://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=8.550364#

Naxos is the place to go. That link will get you to a page where you can sample tracks from this CD. However, if you look to the left of the tracks you will notice a large button that says, "ABOUT THIS RECORDING." Click that and you will have the entire CD pamphlet notes right there for you in a little window.

This is just for Chopin, so I hope you can figure the rest out by yourself: click the "Composers" button on the website's navigation bar and you can search any composer from A-Z. Find your composer, click his discography and search for the CD that has the work on it.

Naxos records almost everything, so I'm pretty sure you can find thorough information on all of those composers and the specific works.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 29, 2006 6:01 pm 
lol_nl wrote:
I found this for you...:

Quote:
(from Wikipedia):
Chopin Etudes op. 10:

No. 3 in E major
A slow cantabile study, in which the right hand must maintain a singing tone in the melody whilst contributing to the accompaniment. It is intended to be played together with No.4 - the score indicates an attacca from one to the other. Of this piece Chopin said, "In all of my life I have never been able to find again so beautiful a melody."

No. 12 in c minor
Étude in C minor, op. 10 no. 12, known as The Revolutionary Étude, is a solo piano work by Frédéric Chopin written circa 1831. It is the 12th of his first set of etudes - "Douze Grandes Etudes" dedicated to "son ami Franz Liszt" (his friend Franz Liszt). The two sets of Études, Opus 10 and 25, are known collectively as the Chopin Études, although Chopin also contributed three other lesser known études.

Unlike études of prior periods (works designed to emphasize and develop particular aspects of musical technique, cf the much feared but essential School of Velocity,[1] or the Five Finger Exercises by Hanon[2]) the romantic études of composers such as Chopin and Liszt are fully developed musical concert pieces, but retain the stylistic goal of emphasizing development of particular piano techniques.

In the case of The Revolutionary Étude, the technique required in the opening bars is playing an extremely fast, long and loud descending harmonic minor scale. What makes it an étude and not just a stylistic element that might be found in any piece is length and repetition.

Another technique developed is cross-rhythms which are used with increasing sophistication to handle the same theme in various successive parallel passages.

The étude appeared around the same time as the Russian takeover of Warsaw in 1831. Chopin was unable to take an active part in the uprising due to his physical frailty and instead poured his emotions on the matter into many pieces that he composed at that time - the most notable being the Revolutionary Étude.

The left hand technique involved in this piece involves evenly played rapid passages throughout (Kamien 231). The basic form is a strophic coda form (A A'). The opening broken chords (diminished chord with an added passing note) and downward passages transition into the main appassionato melody. The octave melody's dotted rhythms and the continuous accompaniment creates tension. At the end of the A' section, the coda provides somewhat of a rest from that tension and then the work recalls the opening in a final descending sweep leading to the final closing chords. (Kamien 232)

Beethoven's Piano Sonata No. 3 in C major is the third sonata of a set of three from his Opus 2 publication. It dates from 1796, three years prior to his groundbreaking Pathétique Sonata. It consists of four movements and lasts about 24 minutes:

*Allegro con brio
*Adagio
*Scherzo (allegro)
*Allegro assai
The sonata is often referred as Beethoven's first virtuosic piano sonata. The opening notes of the allegro con brio clearly fail at controlling the chipperness that is this movement's ethos. The adagio is particularly emotive with its sweet melody followed by a clearly-pedalled minor key section. Likewise, the scherzo also buffers a heavily-pedalled minor key section with more spritely parts. The final allegro assai movement is a pleasant showcase with upward runs, trills, and some minor key drama.






Btw, post no. 100, Yay :lol: !




Hello! :D

Really thoughtful of you to help other people with their program notes :D


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