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PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2007 11:33 pm 
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I think, perhaps we should be considering not weight but potential and kinetic energy. A played finger loaded with a weight behind it has very little potential (and therefore very little kinetic) energy. A finger that is intelligently and strategically placed (so as to create the maximum potential energy) in the instant before keystroke would be a better technique than just crushing your fingers into the keybed, with the weight of your arm. After a key is played, the only weight required is either that to hold that key down so its tone is continued or to provide a pivot point for other parts of the playing mechanism. The correct load(s) is/are to be determined by the individual and his instrument. More is not always better.

I believe it was Anton Rubinstein (and correct me if I'm wrong) who told a young Josef Hoffman, "Play it with your nose, but play it well!"

In other words, he didn't really care what one did to make the sound, just as long as it sounded good.

KISS

Pete


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2007 7:11 am 
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juufa72 wrote:
I don't understand? Are you making fun of american-english verb usage?

Yes of course. I am known to do that :lol:

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2007 8:08 am 
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juufa72 wrote:
techneut wrote:
juufa72 wrote:
Let there be a natural weight falling onto your fingers.

Ouch... doesn't that hurt ? :P


I don't understand? Are you making fun of american-english verb usage? I meant that the weight of your fingers/hands/arms should be enough not having to rely on a your shoulders.


Yes, it's better to avoid letting weights falling onto the fingers, like the keyflap or so :lol:

Regarding support of body weight beside the fingers - I have seen a video of Arthur Rubinstein, where he not only used the support of the shoulders, but the whole body. He literally jumped off the chair for very strong chord playing.

I agree with Pete, as long as it sounds good, it is all ok.
And I also agree with John, that for soft legato playing there is a very relaxed body, shoulders, arms, fingers required. Also to feel the gravity force of the fingers weight in order to produce soft and evenly sound.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2007 8:35 am 
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MindenBlues wrote:
Yes, it's better to avoid letting weights falling onto the fingers, like the keyflap or so :lol:

[OT] Did you see that video clip of Igudesman and Joo where this happens ? I thought that was rather funny.[/OT]

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2007 1:56 pm 
I agree with cydonia,
unlearning bad technique is very difficult. I'd almost rather my students not practice at all than practice the wrong way. It's hard to "undo."
Less tension in your hand is what it comes down to.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2007 10:30 pm 
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Location: Sydney, Australia
[ ."
Less tension in your hand is what it comes down to.[/quote]

Very good point. Less tension. and does not mean NO TENSION.---


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2007 5:32 pm 
hello everybody thanks for all your replies.

i appreciate

but still i have a problem about many fast chromatic octaves....


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 18, 2007 6:08 pm 
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Stephen Farrugia wrote:
hello everybody thanks for all your replies.

i appreciate

but still i have a problem about many fast chromatic octaves....


here you go, playing 4,5,4,5,4,5,fingers....for a while and perhaps for few years and treated as a dessert for every practice session-including other major works.

and good luck, by all mean dnt injur your fingers..


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2007 9:34 am 
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johnmar78 wrote:
here you go, playing 4,5,4,5,4,5,fingers....for a while and perhaps for few years and treated as a dessert for every practice session-including other major works.


I disagree - I don't play chromatic octave runs with strict alternating fingers 4 and 5. Because it is not ergonomic to use the 5th finger on a black key and the 4th finger on a white key what would happen this way. Instead, as others wrote already, use the finger 4 for black keys and finger 5 for white keys. Or better, if you have large hands, use also finger 3. E.g., right hand starting from c to the next higher octave: c: 5, c#:4, then 5,3,4,5,4,5,4,5,3,4,5 (next c). This way a lovely legato is possible (unfortunately not for the other notes played with the thumb), and with time it can get very fast too without creating unnecessary tension in the wrist.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2007 6:35 pm 
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MindenBlues wrote:
johnmar78 wrote:
here you go, playing 4,5,4,5,4,5,fingers....for a while and perhaps for few years and treated as a dessert for every practice session-including other major works.


I disagree - I don't play chromatic octave runs with strict alternating fingers 4 and 5. Because it is not ergonomic to use the 5th finger on a black key and the 4th finger on a white key what would happen this way. Instead, as others wrote already, use the finger 4 for black keys and finger 5 for white keys. Or better, if you have large hands, use also finger 3. E.g., right hand starting from c to the next higher octave: c: 5, c#:4, then 5,3,4,5,4,5,4,5,3,4,5 (next c). This way a lovely legato is possible (unfortunately not for the other notes played with the thumb), and with time it can get very fast too without creating unnecessary tension in the wrist.



sorry :oops: Olaf, that was my oversight...4ths on black key only, 5 on white keys eg b and c;e and f.


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