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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 1:46 am 
Ernesto Lecuona- "Malagueña" from the suite "Anda Lucia"
Rachmaninoff- Prelude in B flat major no.2
Majesty- An arrangement for church that i made

I also fool around in my big piano book :)

And that should be enough to keep me busy for a while...


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 7:07 am 
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TheKlavier wrote:
Ernesto Lecuona- "Malagueña" from the suite "Anda Lucia"

Now that I am happy to hear ! Don't you just love that suite (called Andalucia, after that region of Spain), and Lecuona's piano music in general ?
Any chance of a recording when you are done ?

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 10:27 am 
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Location: damwoude
bach 2 part inventione from pleine prealudium und fugetten
czerny some 299 etudes
rachmaninoff prelude cis get the wrong notes out of it... I almost done :)
schumann/liszt widmung
schubert 3th impromptu

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 11:28 am 
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Quote:
Rachmaninoff- Prelude in B flat major no.2


My condolences to your neighbors :lol:

But seriously...that piece is a beast, good luck!


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 7:30 pm 
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Nocturne Op.72 No.1 in Em-Chopin (now polishing)
2nd Impromptu-Chopin (mi new, most recent addiction, especially played by Yundi Li)
La Fille aux Cheveux de Lin-Debussy (juss started)
Clair de Lune-Debussy (finè)
Sonata 332-Mozart (workin on it)
Invention 13 in Am-Bach (finè, but very sloppy)
Intermezzo Op.118 No.2-Brahms (workin on it)
Finlandia-Sibelius (wonderful arr. for piano)

i wish i could finish all these quicker but my family doesnt like me practicing and the keyboard is only good until you need the rest of the notes both hi and lo, i juss wish i were virtuoso that would solve everything :cry:


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2007 7:23 am 
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arensky wrote:
Those cello sonatas are taking up a lot of practice time even though I don't have to memorize them.
Consequently have had to cut down on solos a bit; now we've got....


Rubinstein-Cello Sonata in D major op.18

Rachmaninov- Prelude in c# minor Op.3#2
Rachmaninov- Prelude in g minor Op.23 #5
Rachmaninov-Prelude in Eb major Op.23 #6 OR Moment Musical in Db Op.16 #5
Rachmaninov-Serenade Op.3 #5
*************************************

Scriabin- Etude in d# minor Op.8 #12 (and maybe a contrasting one)
Scriabin- Preludes from Op.11 #3, #5, LH Prelude Op.9 #1 and some others TBA
Scriabin Two Poems op.32

Shostakovich- Cello Sonata op.40



That was on November 7th and we've finally got



I.


(Cello)Sonata in D major Op.18 Anton Rubinstein (1829-1894)


Idylle in b minor Op.7 #1 Nikolai Medtner (1882-1951)
Skazka (Fairy Tale) in f minor Op.26 #3 "

Prelude in c# minor Op.3 #2 Sergei Rachmaninov (1873-1943)
Moment Musical in Db major Op.16 #3 "
Polichinelle Op.3 #4 "


*************************************

II


Etude in d# minor Op.8 #12 Alexander Scriabin (1872-1915)
Prelude for the LH in c# minor Op.9 #1 "
Prelude in G major Op. 11 #3 "

Four Preludes Op.33 "


(Cello)Sonata in d minor Op.40 Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975)



I expect I'll be posting most of this music (excepting Shostakovich, copyright restricted) in the Audition Room over the next two months. This turned out to be a rather cool program/selection of pieces imo. I play this program on January 28th and February 21st.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2007 7:31 am 
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Good to see you are giving Medtner his credit due Chase ! This seems to be very fitting, seeing as Rachmaninov considered him the greatest composer of his time.

Looking forward to your postings then ! Please post the Shostakovich as well - even if we can't perhaps put it up the site I think it's ok to have it in Audition Room so at least we can listen to it.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2007 10:58 pm 
PJF wrote:
Quote:
Rachmaninoff- Prelude in B flat major no.2


My condolences to your neighbors :lol:

But seriously...that piece is a beast, good luck!


Hah, it's already a problem with my neighbors, since the piece already starts with a constant pounding of the lower octave B flat. It is very hard but i can handle it now... :D


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2007 8:33 pm 
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Schubert's 4 Impromtus, Opus 90. Lots 'o fun and a nice break from the Chopin Etudes :P

Pete


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2007 12:57 am 
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Man you guys are good! I suck!!

Vallee d'Obermann from Years of Pilgrimage by Liszt

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2007 3:05 am 
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Oh, I'm sure we all have our strengths and weaknesses, Jennifer! Spectrum is quite an accomplishment! You don't suck.

Pete


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2007 2:22 pm 
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Location: Obamanation, unfortunately...
I decided to put off CPE Bach's sonata in F until I have access to a real piano (because it sounded like crap on my dinkey keyboard--but what doesn't right :lol: :wink: :( )

So now I am starting with the first piece from Tchaikovsky's Album for the youth.

And Stephen Foster's "Tioga Waltz"

Foster had huch a tragic life. He is considered the "father of Ameican music" and wrote pieces like "O! Sussanna" (However you spell it). He was bedridden and tried to call for a maidservant when he fell out of bed and hit his head on a washbin. Couple hours later he died from his injuries at the age somewhere between 28-35 (forgot exactly).

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2007 3:36 pm 
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Juufa, I’m glad you’re going to do the Stephen Foster piece. I don’t think I have ever heard that one so I’m looking forward to it. Maybe after that you can record 'My Old Kentucky Home'? I love that song and always get choked up when they sing it at the start of the Kentucky Derby. I also laugh when I remember when I was little and was on vacation with my family. We went to Kentucky and my dad kept saying how we were going to visit ‘my old Kentucky home. When we got there I asked my dad, “When did you move out of here?” He replied, “What do you mean, move?” I asked again, “How old were you when you moved from your old Kentucky home?”
I still get teased about that.
Shame about Foster's tragic death. He was one year younger than Chopin when he died.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 28, 2007 2:27 am 
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Location: Obamanation, unfortunately...
pianolady wrote:
Juufa, I’m glad you’re going to do the Stephen Foster piece. I don’t think I have ever heard that one so I’m looking forward to it.


Take a look, it's only 3 pages without any key changes (only a few times is there a F#). What is giving me the most trouble is the lack of dynamics and pedal markings. Perhaps that is left up to the player. So I am trying to play it as many ways as I can and go from there. (But when I do that I mess up in places where I never messed up :x )

Here is a link to a rather dry midi file of the waltz: http://www.pdmusic.org/foster/scf39a.mid

So according to that website Foster was only 13 when he composed the waltz. Not too shabby for a 13 year old :wink:

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2007 1:24 am 
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Wow, it looks like everyone here are playing very difficult pieces. :(
Right now I'm playing:

Chopin Ballade no.1
Chopin Etude Op. 10 no.1 and Op.25 no. 12

Beethoven Sonata Appassionata 1st mvt.

Of course I play many different pieces but these three are the only pieces I practice at the moment.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2007 1:33 am 
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hunwoo wrote:
Wow, it looks like everyone here are playing very difficult pieces. :(
Right now I'm playing:

Chopin Ballade no.1
Chopin Etude Op. 10 no.1 and Op.25 no. 12

Beethoven Sonata Appassionata 1st mvt.

Of course I play many different pieces but these three are the only pieces I practice at the moment.



Don't do that. I hate when people say "oh my repitoire is nothing to be proud of...I am only playing Liszt's sonata in B, Chopin's Bolero, Rachmaninov prelude 3/2, and Mozarts sonata k.333....I know it's not that special"

:evil: :evil: :evil: :evil: gah!

Do not think that I am venting my wrath at you because I am not. I just felt like venting. So please do not think that I am causing menace to you or anyone else. But there are a few "thickheaded" people whom I had conversations with and they try to lower themselves but in the end they are coming off as arrogant fools.

Thank you for bearing with me :wink:

p.s. Nice repitoire. Will you record them?

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2007 2:30 am 
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i recorded my chopin ballade and i put it up in audition room, you can listen to it. :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2007 1:15 pm 
Currently I'm working on getting all my conservatory audition repertoire together, which consists of

Bach Prelude and Fugue No.6 in D minor, Well-Tempered Clavier II
Beethoven Sonata Op.13 in C minor, "Pathetique"
Liszt "Funerailles" from Poetic and Religious Harmonies
Chopin Etude Op.25 No.12, "Ocean"
Rachmaninoff Prelude Op.23 No.5 in G minor


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2007 7:02 pm 
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i wish u the best of luck on ur audition and wut n where is the concervatory, the name i mean?


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2007 7:09 pm 
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romanza wrote:
i wish u the best of luck on ur audition and wut n where is the concervatory, the name i mean?

What's this language ? :?

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 Post subject: Re: What works are you learning?
PostPosted: Fri Mar 30, 2007 12:01 pm 
[quote="joeisapiano"]Had to revive pianosociety's most popular topic!

Already ready recordings (some are on the site, others I'll send soon), and I
play actually these pieces too:

Bach 4 preludes and fugue from WTK
Scarlatti 3 Sonatas
Beethoven op.27/2 and 31/2
Schubert D959
Chopin 3 Mazurkas, nocturnes 48-1 and 55-2 , Polonaise 26-2 and Polonaise-Fantaisie
Liszt-Schubert Soireé de Vienne n.7 ,Aufenthalt, Litanei
Liszt-Schumann Widmung
Liszt- Mendelssohn Auf flugeln des gesanges
Scriabin 2 Impromptu and 2 Preludes
Prokofiev Romeo and Juliet before parting
Bach-Friedman Wachet auf..

I'm working to

Bach Concerto from Alessandro Marcello
Scarlatti other 4-5 sonatas
Chopin Polonaises op.40 etudes op12-12 and 25-12 Nocturne op.62-2
Mendelssohn 3-4 Lieder ohne worte
Schumann two between Variations on a Beethoven's theme, Variations on Clara Wieck' theme,
Novelletta n.6
Liszt-Mendelssohn Suleika (WONDERFUL), Neue Liebe
Bach-Friedman Saecular cantata
Scriabin 2-3 Mazurkas op.3
Korngolg Passacaglia from I Sonata
Slow movement of III Sonata
Pieces op.3


Bye to all,
Sandro "Sarrasani" Bisotti.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 30, 2007 2:09 pm 
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after one week practising almost done with the lark of balakirev :)

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while composing I've got always an picture in my head 'beethoven'


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 30, 2007 4:21 pm 
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rachmaninoff wrote:
after one week practising almost done with the lark of balakirev :)


Very nice. Can't wait.

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2007 6:10 am 
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thank you. I'm really working hard to impress my teacher. yesterday I worked till 3 in the night... on more pieces also.

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music is enough for lifetime but lifetime isn't enough for music 'rachmaninoff'

while composing I've got always an picture in my head 'beethoven'


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 01, 2007 2:04 pm 
I'm playing at the moment-:Chopin's first ballade, polonaise op. 53, prelude no. 16 "Hades"
And i'm just about to start Liszt's Hungarian rhapsody No. 2 (a fun sounding piece, though quite difficult :()


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2007 12:49 am 
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Puh-len-tee... :lol:

Chopin's three "Heroic" polonaises have my attention right now. Memorizing his second concerto, too. Rach's second is on the back burner but still very much alive.

Bach prelude and fugue...Beethoven Sonatas...trying my hand at Jazz, that's not going too smoothly but I'm convinced it will help my performance anxiety (Cziffra comes to mind).

Pete


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2007 2:06 am 
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Wait, Chopin's three "Heroic" polonaises? I think that the Op. 53 in A-flat Major is the only one with that title. Either way, it's still amazing to be able to play any of his polonaises (except the 1817 one in G Minor maybe)!!


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2007 11:33 pm 
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Yeah there's three. Opp. 44, 53 and 61. There's a few structural differences that set them apart.

Note the long introductions in those three as compared to the others.

Learning them as a set (when you can see the striking similarities among them) is much easier than going one by one.

Pete


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 20, 2007 3:41 pm 
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My first College assignment!

Bach: Tocatta in D major
Mozart: Sonata No. 18 in D major, K. 576
Schumann: Carnaval Op. 9

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Last edited by joeisapiano on Sun Apr 29, 2007 6:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 25, 2007 5:29 pm 
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Location: Obamanation, unfortunately...
1) Some pieces from Tchaikovsky's Album for the Young
2) Two pieces from Scharwenka's Album for the Young
3) THE Rachmaninov prelude (but just for self-amusment...remember Rachmaninov had very big hands. I have small hands, but only hands small :lol: )

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2007 8:22 am 
hello, this is my first post on the pianosociety forum
:)

Chopin ballade no.1
Beethoven sonata op.13
Bach prelude and fugue (can't remember :shock: )
Handel suite no.5

The chopin is about half way done, i have the first two movements of the beethoven. I'm going to perfect the first movement before moving on to the third. The handel suite is almost done, I'm just adding some finishing touches. And the bach is pretty new so i havent gotten very far.

I'm also working on Chopin etude op.10 no.1 for a "duel" with a good friend of mine.

I'm going to try chopin 24 preludes op.28 soon.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2007 1:15 pm 
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With this repertoire, I think you can name yourself Present Pianist. :) I hope you will post your Ballade No. 1.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2007 6:37 pm 
well, I'm pretty young. My user name is future pianist because i want to be a professional pianist when I'm older.

yes i will post my first ballade shouldnt be too much longer


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 20, 2007 2:04 pm 
Hello :D

Well, I`m working on...

*Andante Spianato (Chopin, but actually finished I need to keep it alive for a concert)
*Andaluza (Granados, almost finished)
*Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy, Transcription for 8 hands (I cant wait to hear how it sounds, just doing my individual piece for a while now...)

I want to start with :
*Fantasie Impromptu (Chopin)
*Lyrische Stücke op.43 - VI. To the Spring (Grieg)

I`ll see how it goes :lol:

Elysium


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2007 6:32 pm 
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I'm trying to decide what to play in the fall, and this is what I've come up with so far:

Bach Partita in E Minor - I think that I will work on all movements except for the Gavotta and the Gigue this fall. I have to do a recital in the spring, and I'd like to play the whole thing then, but I think the Gigue is the most difficult movement, and I just haven't gotten a feel for the Gavotta yet. Has anyone here ever played this partita (especially the Gavotta) before?

Chopin 25/12 Etude in C Minor - I've been wanting to do this one for a while, but I think it's finally time, since I've been idly learning it for years and can play it memorized at about half tempo with no mistakes, if not more than half tempo.

I always have difficulty choosing my third piece, because I'm not very fond of much from the 18th century (not counting the cuspers like Beethoven and Schubert, which I can't choose because I always have a Chopin piece) and I'm not very familiar with contemporary music. I think I'll end up going with the Rachmaninoff Prelude in D Major Op. 23 No. 4.

Any tips on any of these pieces would be greatly appreciated. :)

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2007 7:27 pm 
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There has been a lot of contemporary music on the Audition forum, lately. Maybe you can find something you like there. I think your Rachmaninoff selection is good. This is one of the 'tear-jerkers' for sure. I hope the women in your audience bring a tissue. Have you ever played op. 23, no. 6? I'm practicing it now, and it is also very beautiful, but not as dramatic as no. 4. It is shorter, though, if you want to cut some time out of your program.

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 29, 2007 6:01 am 
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Terez wrote:
Bach Partita in E Minor - I think that I will work on all movements except for the Gavotta and the Gigue this fall. I have to do a recital in the spring, and I'd like to play the whole thing then, but I think the Gigue is the most difficult movement, and I just haven't gotten a feel for the Gavotta yet. Has anyone here ever played this partita (especially the Gavotta) before?

Yes, but I've never really seriously worked on it. The Gigue is one of the most audacious things JSB ever wrote, and possibly one of the hardest too, musically perhaps even more so than technically.
I assume your problem with the Gavotte is how the triplets relate to the dotted 16ths ? My approach is to take the dotted 16ths as normal, except when pitted against triplets, then I plaim them together with the last note of the triplets. I believe that is normal practice in Baroque music, and it sounds a bit messy if you try to do it otherwise.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 30, 2007 2:59 pm 
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Quote:
Maybe you can find something you like there. I think your Rachmaninoff selection is good. This is one of the 'tear-jerkers' for sure. I hope the women in your audience bring a tissue.

I definitely haven't decided on this one yet, and if I do it this fall, that doesn't necessarily mean I'll be playing it for my recital in the spring, because I've got to have a fresh repertoire for the spring semester - I'll definitely want to do the partita for the recital (and I want to start working on it now) but that's the only thing I've decided on.

My fall repertoire will be used for an adjudication at the end of the fall semester where all the piano profs will decide if they're going to let me major in piano performance. They've already given me a good scholarship, but I'll have to play some more difficult stuff for that trial - my scholarship audition stuff was worked up in a hurry.

Quote:
Have you ever played op. 23, no. 6? I'm practicing it now, and it is also very beautiful, but not as dramatic as no. 4. It is shorter, though, if you want to cut some time out of your program.

That's actually a good one - I think I like it more than the other, which was recommended by my teacher. I hunted for a recording, since there's not one posted at piano society, and I found one here (link). I think my Chopin pick is dramatic enough, don't you? ;)

Quote:
The Gigue is one of the most audacious things JSB ever wrote, and possibly one of the hardest too, musically perhaps even more so than technically.

I think I'm looking forward to working on this movement more than any other - I've never heard a recording, but I imagine the eighth notes to be stacatto and the dotted eighths to be accented pretty much throughout the whole thing. Thinking about trying to maintain that throughout is actually exciting. :)

Quote:
I assume your problem with the Gavotte is how the triplets relate to the dotted 16ths?

Yes!

Quote:
My approach is to take the dotted 16ths as normal, except when pitted against triplets, then I plaim them together with the last note of the triplets. I believe that is normal practice in Baroque music

Yay! I hope my teacher approves...

Quote:
it sounds a bit messy if you try to do it otherwise.

That's exactly my problem - I don't usually have a problem with oddly matched rhythms to this degree, but I've been having the hardest time making something musical out of it, taking it literally. It still won't be my favorite movement - the Gigue and the Toccata are both awesome, and the Sarabande and the Air I love. I even really like the Courante and the Allemande...just not so much as the others. The Gavotte I think will always be my least favorite, but at least I don't have to hate it now. :)

Fortunately, the Toccata and the Gigue are the only movements that will require real work, lol...

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 30, 2007 8:01 pm 
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Thanks for the link to the prelude. I have only listened to Ashkenazy over on that Russian site. It's nice to hear other recordings. I noticed this woman changes the pedal more often and Ashkenazy makes more dramatic dynamic changes. I like both versions.

Quote:
I think my Chopin pick is dramatic enough, don't you?

Yes! Such a nice little easy-going, light-hearted little ditty. :lol: (You must be a good player to tackle such hard pieces.)

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"Simplicity is the highest goal, achievable when you have overcome all difficulties." ~ Frederic Chopin

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 7:58 am 
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Such a nice little easy-going, light-hearted little ditty. :lol:

Ha!
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(You must be a good player to tackle such hard pieces.)

Depends on what your definition of "good player" is - I think of it more like, I tackle the hard pieces so that I can become a good player...I've messed around with both the partita and the Chopin etude for years, though never really practicing the partita seriously. The etude, I have actually practiced a good deal over the years, and now all that is left is to bring it up to performance tempo. I have four months to do it...

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"Z Czernym poznałem się na panie brat—na dwa fortepiana często z nim u niego grywałem. Dobry człowiek, ale nic więcej..." - Fryderyk Chopin


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 10:57 am 
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Do you have any recording device, yet? It's a great motivational tool, so to speak. Ever since I started recording myself, not only do I practice much more, but I also listen much better, too.

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"Simplicity is the highest goal, achievable when you have overcome all difficulties." ~ Frederic Chopin

my videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/monicapiano
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 11:12 am 
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No, unfortunately, I don't...and I am even more strapped for cash now than I was before, due to going back to school. :( I have a friend that is willing to record me, but I have to find a church or something where I could do it, because my own piano is digital and my mom's baby grand is in not so good shape since Katrina. :( I could ask my friend to go up to my school (1.5 hours away) and he probably would, but I feel bad about asking him to do such things.

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"Z Czernym poznałem się na panie brat—na dwa fortepiana często z nim u niego grywałem. Dobry człowiek, ale nic więcej..." - Fryderyk Chopin


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 01, 2007 11:35 pm 
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Right now, I'm trying to record two Chopin etudes.

They're close.

Here's one. (not ready for the site)

Pete


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 12:31 am 
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The 10/9 is one of my favorites. :) Unfortunately, I have more difficulty with that one than a lot of them that would probably generally be considered more difficult. In other words, I have more difficulty with that one than 10/3, 10/4, 10/12, 25/1, 25/11, and 25/12. Is it just me?

Anyway, it sounds like it's coming along good, Pete. Which other one are you working on?

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 1:17 am 
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Oh, I forgot about this one, but I love it too. The sound, the way it takes you on a dreamy, swirling adventure - well - it's soooo good. Think I'll put this one on my list. Thanks Pete!

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"Simplicity is the highest goal, achievable when you have overcome all difficulties." ~ Frederic Chopin

my videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/monicapiano
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 2:24 pm 
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Terez wrote:
The 10/9 is one of my favorites. :) Unfortunately, I have more difficulty with that one than a lot of them that would probably generally be considered more difficult. In other words, I have more difficulty with that one than 10/3, 10/4, 10/12, 25/1, 25/11, and 25/12. Is it just me?

Anyway, it sounds like it's coming along good, Pete. Which other one are you working on?


Yes, the LH is a pain in the you-know-what. I have the notes memorized, I just need to practice playing it. It's quite different to have something learned 'in theory' versus putting that theoretical knowledge into physical action.

The other is the 10/2, the "chromatic madness" etude. That one makes the 10/1 look like opus 28/4.
It's 'memorized' (in theory). I haven't got the fingers to play it right now; practice will fix that post haste.

Pete


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 2:37 pm 
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Terez wrote:
The 10/9 is one of my favorites. :) Unfortunately, I have more difficulty with that one than a lot of them that would probably generally be considered more difficult. In other words, I have more difficulty with that one than 10/3, 10/4, 10/12, 25/1, 25/11, and 25/12. Is it just me?

Anyway, it sounds like it's coming along good, Pete. Which other one are you working on?


Yes, the LH is a pain in the you-know-what. I have the notes memorized, I just need to practice playing it. It's quite different to have something learned 'in theory' versus putting that theoretical knowledge into physical action.

The other is the 10/2, the "chromatic madness" etude. That one makes the 10/1 look like opus 28/4.
It's 'memorized' (in theory). I haven't got the fingers to play it right now; practice will fix that post haste. It's pretty close, too.

Pete


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 6:01 pm 
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Aww, I was enjoying listening to your 10/2, and it cut off! :(

The 10/2 is one of my favorites, too, and I find it easier than the 10/1. Perhaps that is because I have worked on the 25/6, but I also found the 25/6 to be easier than the 10/1.

In my opinion, though, the hardest etude is the 25/4. The jumping in the left hand makes the 10/9 left-hand jumping look mild.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 7:19 pm 
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Terez wrote:
Aww, I was enjoying listening to your 10/2, and it cut off! :(

The 10/2 is one of my favorites, too, and I find it easier than the 10/1. Perhaps that is because I have worked on the 25/6, but I also found the 25/6 to be easier than the 10/1.

In my opinion, though, the hardest etude is the 25/4. The jumping in the left hand makes the 10/9 left-hand jumping look mild.


Yeah, I cut it off because that's where I screw up! :lol: Bars 25-34 are insecure at this point. This etude is really giving me problems. I can play it slowly and not miss a single note but I want to play it at 144. I may split the difference and aim for 126+-

You know, it goes to show how different pianists encounter differing problems, depending on individual quirks. I find the jumps in the 25-4 not particularly hard to execute, but the 543 oriented fingering of the 10-2 extremely difficult.

A note about the 10-9: I play the LH legato, with the fingering pattern 5-3-1-4-1-3. I can't do the pattern 5-4-1-4-1-4.

Okay, here's something else I'm working on. This is the first time I've recorded myself playing this.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 8:10 pm 
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Well, it certainly is Beethoven Week!
Pete, I have never heard this before, but it sounded really good. Like ready-for-the-audition-room, good. I forgot - do you record with an Edirol recorder?

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"Simplicity is the highest goal, achievable when you have overcome all difficulties." ~ Frederic Chopin

my videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/monicapiano
my personal website: http://www.monicaalianello.com


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