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 Post subject: Postlude in C Major
PostPosted: Thu Apr 10, 2014 12:30 am 
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Here's a piece I wrote for the organ. Just love the tone of the Hauptwerk St. Annes Moseley, really need headphones to get the full effect of this organ. Someday I hope to upgrade though, because it is actually a smaller organ.

Piece is in the baroque style, don't know if that comes across or not.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HoGE913eafs

Recorded last weekend, comments are welcome.


Attachments:
Organ piece short bachlike.pdf [14.54 KiB]
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 Post subject: Re: Postlude in C Major
PostPosted: Sun Apr 13, 2014 7:15 pm 
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Hi again, Riley.

That was a nice video! I like the three views. You know I'm not good at commenting on Bach, or even the organ in general. But this piece sounded nice because it's not very long....the organ sound doesn't bother me on short pieces. Regarding the piece, sometimes the chord progressions sound a little odd to me. Like I'm not sure they should go the way they go. But at least it makes it interesting. :)

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 Post subject: Re: Postlude in C Major
PostPosted: Sun Apr 13, 2014 9:56 pm 
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Hi Monica,

Thanks for listening! Yes, I think the syncing issues were not as bad as my first video attempting three parts, the Bach BWV 721. I think Heather made a good point somewhere here saying that organ kind of disconnects you from expression, what you get as a piano player. I kind of like that though, expression isn't as important to me as all the right notes. I guess Beethoven would disagree didn't he say if one plays wrong notes its bad but without passion is inexcusable! Regarding the harmony, I'm a huge fan of quick harmonic turns, so glad it keeps it interesting, if not as.. Predictable as could be, so to speak.
By the way happy Palm Sunday!

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 Post subject: Re: Postlude in C Major
PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2014 8:42 pm 
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What a nice and cheerful piece ! I also think that some sequences sound a bit twee (or call it unusual) but some of it is really good.
Very relaxed just to fill in the pedal part with one hand. If I had the space for it I would consider a virtual organ too. It would have to be a two-manual job with a separate foot pedal board though, so as not to lose the expressive connection with the organ ;-)

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 Post subject: Re: Postlude in C Major
PostPosted: Wed Apr 16, 2014 1:01 am 
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Quote:
What a nice and cheerful piece !


Glad it registered in your mind that way, I'll take that as a compliment; as I usually write gloomy dismal pieces -- as you know :lol:

Quote:
Very relaxed just to fill in the pedal part with one hand


love the sound of that 16' diapason. The only problem here is that unless you are wearing good headphones in a quiet room, I think it i hard to hear.

Quote:
If I had the space for it I would consider a virtual organ too.


Why not? I don't think it would take up nearly as much space as a grand, ofc without the elegance of a traditional wood console, just a barebones organ for recording.

Quote:
It would have to be a two-manual job with a separate foot pedal board though, so as not to lose the expressive connection with the organ ;-)


An expressive connection, and it keeps you on your toes. I was cheating with the LH playing what should've been foot work :wink:

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 Post subject: Re: Postlude in C Major
PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2014 4:21 am 
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Interesting harmonic inflections at times and quite enjoyable. I'm wondering why didn't you use flats instead of sharps though, since the last cadence is a F minor chord (4 flats), and the chord progressions leading up to there are in that general area!


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 Post subject: Re: Postlude in C Major
PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 11:13 pm 
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Thanks for listening Jonathan. I suppose I am more of sharps guy than flats. I just thought if I made whole piece f minor it would be harder to play than if I just kept it in C maj/A min all the way throughout. I once gave David a piece of mine, in 6 sharps and he said he could learn it, but that it would take much longer than if just in C.

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 Post subject: Re: Postlude in C Major
PostPosted: Sun Aug 17, 2014 8:12 pm 
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Hey Riley,

I just got a chance to listen and look over your piece. I like the sound. I would consider more of British Romantic rather than Baroque and Bach-Like. It has that sturdy Edward Elgar type feeling. Harmonically, you do take us through a labyrinth of keys. Some of the shifts sound a little sudden, but I actually think that it adds to the charm.

All of those sharps, make no sense for several reasons. First, the piece is ultimately in F minor -- a flat key. The key signature for C major/A minor completely belies this and the sharps make it look more difficult and possibly atonal. Your first section (up to the repeated "A" pedal can actually be seen as in A major, since it cadences on A). There are 2 sharp keys that can be related to F major using relationships that Beethoven used a lot in his sonatas. They are A major (mediant major -- III) and D major (sub-mediant major -- VI). Beethoven often used these as alternatives to the Key of the Dominant (V) in the exposition and the Key of the tonic (I) in the recapitulation. A good example is his Waldstein Sonata where the exposition goes from Tonic in C to Mediant major in E. In the Recapitulation, he then starts with Tonic in C and reprises the second theme group in A major (III and VI having a dominant/tonic relationship).

The fact that you essentially start in Mediant major in this case (the first 3 measures seem to try to express G major (C - G - D - [G: the logical outcome] or IV I V [I]) Instead you use the D harmony in measure 3 as a pivot into A major since it is the sub-dominant (IV) of A. After this section, a little enharmonic trickery starts to take us into the territory of F minor. First it goes to Cb major (possibly Gb, which would be a little easier to reconcile since that is the Neapolitan (bII major) of F major and minor, but the cadence is clearly on Cb). But now that we are in flats, the two essential notes that distinguish minor from major are ever present (Ab or b3 and Db or b6). Thus the ending in F minor comes very logically. BTW, the fact that you ended the entire piece on F major does not alter the F minorness of it. This is what is known as a "Picardy 3rd", the major 3rd in the final chord of an otherwise minor piece. Bach employed it regularly.

Anyway, that said, I took a little time to re-notate your score. I am actually uploading 2 versions. The first is notated completely in F minor. Through the initial A major section there will be a lot of accidentals, particularly sharps. The second changes key signatures several times to represent the prevailing key at the time.

Scott


Attachments:
Tucker - Bach_Like1.pdf [24.69 KiB]
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Tucker - Bach_Like3.pdf [24.37 KiB]
Downloaded 18 times
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 Post subject: Re: Postlude in C Major
PostPosted: Mon Aug 18, 2014 7:11 pm 
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Hey Chris,

Concerning a virtual organ, You can put one together for rather cheap. The Hauptwerk program can be downloaded for free (I have it) with the St. Anne's organ. 61 note MIDI keyboards come rather cheap. The pedal boards can be expensive. There are MIDI retro-fits for such organs as old Hammonds and possibly others. Granted, old Hamond console organs still get a premium price, but many others can be acquired for a song (since you would probably just want to gut it, it doesn't matter about the internal electronics.) Of course, space is always a concern.

The biggest thing is having a fast enough computer to avoid "MIDI delay". Hauptwerk organs are massive files since they sample every pipe, but they are excellent. They also have sound samples of historic harpsichords and pianos, and if you want to get into schmaltz, some excellent theatre organs.

Scott


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 Post subject: Re: Postlude in C Major
PostPosted: Mon Aug 18, 2014 7:17 pm 
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Thanks Scott, yes I am (vaguely) aware of all the possibilities. I guess I just can't be bothered fiddling with keyboards, footboards, software, a too slow PC and cables, and would rather hop off to a church and play the real thing. Currently putting out some tentacles towards that goal. I must really start to play again before it's been too long.

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 Post subject: Re: Postlude in C Major
PostPosted: Mon Aug 25, 2014 6:58 pm 
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Scott,

Thanks very much for taking the trouble to renotate my score. I agree with your changes and funny you say it, Elgar is a big influence of mine. Also Schumann, but interestingly enough, Elgar was known as saying "Schumann is my ideal." So maybe these two composers are really two sides to the same coin! The second score really looks a challenge, but I suppose to a very good organist, not entirely. I once had the great fortune to listen to a great organist play an almost 2 hour program. There was everything in there from German's Festive Trumpet Tune to Cantabile by the great Franck! I can only imagine that two or three of the 20 something pieces shared a key. All this being said and I don't think he made on error, incredible.

Now to comment on your recent submission @ the WIP corner :)

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 Post subject: Re: Postlude in C Major
PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 8:18 am 
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pianoman342 wrote:
Scott,

Quote:
The second score really looks a challenge


Yes, the second score does look a challenge, but those are the keys (or as close to them) as I can get. Notice that when I put the "Cb" key signature in front of the last part that there were so few accidentals necessary. I find this funny that you think that this is too difficult. The second version is the exact same as your version, except that the notes are in, at least close, to the right key. Once you add the key signature, you will notice that there are fewer accidentals necessary.

The last things that performers want to see are accidentals that have no meaning. We want to know where we are in the music. And I can assure you that Gb is not the key. But that is what you have written.

Scott


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 Post subject: Re: Postlude in C Major
PostPosted: Fri Oct 17, 2014 4:00 pm 
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I'd like to share with you a demo of the Hauptwerk by the UK organist Daniel Cook. It is an excellent little piece that I have enjoyed listening to:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hhvdR3ZoLp4

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