Piano Society
Free Classical Keyboard Recordings
It is currently Fri Nov 28, 2014 9:27 am

All times are UTC - 1 hour




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 45 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 12:12 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 2003
Location: U.S.A.
Recently I had posted four Liadoff preludes which many listeners enjoyed, so I decided to present more of these pieces. Anatol Liadoff (1855-1914) was a Russian late romantic composer who had studied piano at the St. Petersburg Conservatory and composition with Rimsky-Korsakov, and in 1887 joined the faculty teaching mostly composition. The principal influence in his music was Chopin.

Here are the next pieces I have submitted in this posting:

Prelude, Op. 11, No. 1 in B minor (1886) marked moderato;
Prelude, Op. 24, No. 1 in E (1890) marked lento and dedicated to A. Sergeeva;
Prelude, Op. 31, No. 2 in B flat minor (1893) marked largo and dedicated to Porfini Trifonov; and
Prelude, Op. 40, No. 3 in D minor (1897) marked lento.

These miniatures are very short, altogether approximately 8 minutes total listening time, so I hope you’ll want to hear and enjoy the entire group.

Comments welcome.

Piano: Baldwin Model L Artist Grand (6’3”) with lid opened on the singer stick.
Recorder: Korg MR-1000
Microphones: Earthworks TC-20 matched pair of small diaphragm omni-directional condenser mics in
A-B configuration



Liadov - Prelude in B minor, Op. 11 No. 1
Liadov - Prelude in E major, Op. 24 No. 1
Liadov - Prelude in B-flat minor, Op. 31 No. 2
Liadov - Prelude in D minor, Op. 40 No. 3

_________________
"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 1:38 am 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2006 12:38 pm
Posts: 8533
Hi David, these are up. Sounded very nice and played well.
I have a little favor to ask you: If you submit more Liadov, please use the spelling standard on the site = Liadov. It saves me some time from having to change everything in your file names.
Thank you! :)

_________________
"Simplicity is the highest goal, achievable when you have overcome all difficulties." ~ Frederic Chopin

my videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/monicapiano
my personal website: http://www.monicaalianello.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 2:17 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 2003
Location: U.S.A.
Hi Monica,

Thanks for putting those pieces up for me. Sorry about the nomenclature thing. :oops: Although "never say never", I probably will be moving on to a different composer for my next effort. I was glad to do eight of these Liadov preludes though, which will help a little to fill out his page in the archive.

***As one final detail on these, could you please add A. Sergeeva as dedicatee for Prelude Op. 24 and Porfini Trifonov as dedicatee for Op. 31? Thanks again.

David

_________________
"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 8:48 am 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Mon Jun 12, 2006 11:45 am
Posts: 9602
Location: Netherlands
Good work David. I especially like your rendition of Op.31 No.2.
Op.11 no.1 I find a bit impatient, and the LH rather too dominant. This needs more repose. more ebb and flow, the LH seemingly coming out of nowhere at the beginning. I find it helps in some places to let the RH take the top notes of the LH chords.
Op.24 no.1 seems rather too fast and literal to me, your tempo being way above the metronome mark. Op.40 no.3 is nicely done but it seems a rather uninspired piece. Nice to have more Liadov on the site. I am currently preparing re-recordings of the Op.10 and op.11 sets.

_________________
Nothing is always absolutely so -- Sturgeon's law
Chris Breemer


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 1:03 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2006 12:38 pm
Posts: 8533
Ok, David, I will add those names when I get to work. (on the train now ) you might have to remind me, or maybe Chris can do it.

_________________
"Simplicity is the highest goal, achievable when you have overcome all difficulties." ~ Frederic Chopin

my videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/monicapiano
my personal website: http://www.monicaalianello.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 4:16 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 2003
Location: U.S.A.
Hi Chris,

Thanks for listening and your feedback. Yes, I think I most enjoyed playing Op. 31, No. 2 and it probably shows.

The Op. 11, No. 1 is marked moderato which I usually interpret as a quarter = 66+ (even passing 100 in some instances). I did notice a very nice rendition with many leisurely nuances, however it was being played largo where a quarter = 44 and considering that it's in 2/4 with the LH chords being two beats of triplets. I was astounded! As tempting as that was, I decided not to do it as it could lead to criticism on the tempo. I'm not sure why in this haunting, lyrical piece Liadoff wanted moderato. It made little sense to me, so I played it approaching 60, definitely the slowest moderato possible. So the brisker tempo I used probably made it sound more "impatient". The piece would have been more effective marked adagio in my opinion. Yes, I was careful to make the opening appear out of nowhere to achieve a dolce effect there. It's not an easy effect to create and takes several efforts. Your comment on the LH sometimes being dominant is interesting. When I was first working on the piece, it became apparent to me that it was essential for the LH to participate in the crescendos and diminuendos, even though given the figuration, the RH could have handled that chore nicely by itself against a quiet and subdued accompaniment. But by allowing the LH a greater role in those dynamics added much drama to the piece, so I went with it. By in large, I think it was successful, although there is one brief spot in particular where the RH melody did struggled to stay on top.

Op. 24, No. 1. This piece is marked lento with a quarter = 50. I just listened, then turned on the metronome. My playing is just a hair faster, but very, very close to the marking. I think that what Liadoff was aiming for here was to create a sense of occasion in the way that Schumann or Grieg could. The opening almost suggests Russian bells to me, and there is a certain hustle and bustle and sense of great expectation in the air there. I do believe this is really the way it should be played.

Op. 40, No. 3. Believe it or not, I found this little piece the most difficult to play of the lot! It's marked lento, a quarter = 42. It's immediately obvious that the character of the piece is a lament. But 42??? At a higher marking, this piece could be so much more expressive in my opinion. I was tempted to just disregard the marking entirely. But then I came to this conclusion: The piece has a thin texture and is very transparent indeed. The music is also very childlike. Perhaps the child lost a household pet, or something similar. That lead me to believe that simplicity needed to rank very high in the interpretation. Bringing in too many expressive effects in this little piece would have likely created excesses. So I left well enough alone and honored Liadoff's tempo. Perhaps I could have employed more pedal, although the figuration is all passing and neighboring tones, so it would be pedaling every eighth note. So I relied more on "finger pedaling" and other judicious uses of pedal as opportunities allowed. Overall, I don't think this composition is one of the best in the volumes, but I was glad to play it nonetheless.

Good luck on your Op. 10 and 11 sets.

Oh, could you please glance at Monica's comment above on the dedicatees? I think it important that they be shown. Perhaps you two could flip a coin on it? :)

David

_________________
"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


Last edited by Rachfan on Mon Aug 01, 2011 6:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 4:58 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2010 7:28 am
Posts: 1250
Location: Springfield, Missouri, USA
Rachfan wrote:
It's marked lento, a quarter = 42

I think that is too slow David, for it leaves little room for tempos slower than lento: grave, larghissimo, lentissimo, gravissimo (a pulse next to death!). As I write this it is interesting to note the relationship to hear rate. A "normal" heart rate is 60-100 bpm. Faster is tachycardia (or worse flutter or fibrillation), and slower is bradycardia. But where a heart rate of mid-to-high 50's attracts my attention, anything in the 40's wins you 2-days with a Holter monitor. If symptomatic too, you get a nice new pacemaker implanted in your chest, or even without symptoms if you're in the 30's or flirting with the 20's. It would be a fascinating study (IMO) to study the tempos of music to see if there are some that are outside "physiologic." Can a pattern be too slow or too fast to fall within the scope of human appreciation? Certainly this is true with frequency of sound. Just because a metronome can go as slow as the 40s does that mean that music (a strictly human affair) does also?

Curious,
Eddy

_________________
Eddy M. del Rio, MD
"A smattering will not do. They must know all the keys, major and minor, and they must literally 'know them backwards.'" - Josef Lhevinne


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 5:25 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2006 12:38 pm
Posts: 8533
Rachfan wrote:
Oh, could you please glance at Monica's comment above on the dedicatees? I think it important that they be shown. Perhaps you two could flip a coin on it? :)

David

David


I just did it. But Chris - can you please take off the bold type? My computer at work won't let me do it.

_________________
"Simplicity is the highest goal, achievable when you have overcome all difficulties." ~ Frederic Chopin

my videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/monicapiano
my personal website: http://www.monicaalianello.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 6:51 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 2003
Location: U.S.A.
It actually turned out to be a team effort. I think Liadoff would be pleased having those names included. Thanks!

David

_________________
"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 7:17 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 2003
Location: U.S.A.
Hi Eddy,

That's an interesting explanation of the human heartbeat. And yes, your thought of a study to correlated tempo with physiolgics would be fascinating. I'm trying to think of another piece that I've played at M a quarter = 42, and it eludes me. I can't tell you how I "itched" to just disregard it, as I was really straining to appreciate the music playing it so slowly while desperate to make it convincing too. Maybe this piece is actually meant as an etude, not a prelude. :lol: But as I described in my explanation, I felt that I had thought of a plausible supporting rationale that might explain Liadoff's intention, thus decided to play it as he wished. Whether it will be appreciated remains to be seen. I would bet that over the decades many have taken some significant liberties with that tempo. It is fact, of course, that many composers, like Brahms, were careful to include metronome markings and then when performing the pieces themselves totally disregarded their own markings, and when asked about it, just casually brushed it off. Could Liadoff be in that same boat? We might never know.

David

_________________
"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 9:13 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Mon Jun 12, 2006 11:45 am
Posts: 9602
Location: Netherlands
pianolady wrote:
I just did it. But Chris - can you please take off the bold type? My computer at work won't let me do it.

Tell your boss you need a new computer. Do it now. Never mind the spreadsheets and word documents, this is important.
I also added the word Dedication: because just the names looks a bit funny to me.

_________________
Nothing is always absolutely so -- Sturgeon's law
Chris Breemer


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 10:44 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 2003
Location: U.S.A.
Thanks Monica and Chris for adding those dedications. While we know who Markoff and Blumenfeld were, some of the other names on these scores might be more obscure to us today, but clearly they were very important to Liadoff. So it's fitting that we note them here. I appreciate it!

David

_________________
"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Tue Aug 02, 2011 7:12 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2010 6:18 pm
Posts: 1040
Rachfan wrote:
Hi Eddy,

That's an interesting explanation of the human heartbeat. And yes, your thought of a study to correlated tempo with physiolgics would be fascinating. I'm trying to think of another piece that I've played at M a quarter = 42, and it eludes me. I can't tell you how I "itched" to just disregard it, as I was really straining to appreciate the music playing it so slowly while desperate to make it convincing too. Maybe this piece is actually meant as an etude, not a prelude. :lol: But as I described in my explanation, I felt that I had thought of a plausible supporting rationale that might explain Liadoff's intention, thus decided to play it as he wished. Whether it will be appreciated remains to be seen. I would bet that over the decades many have taken some significant liberties with that tempo. It is fact, of course, that many composers, like Brahms, were careful to include metronome markings and then when performing the pieces themselves totally disregarded their own markings, and when asked about it, just casually brushed it off. Could Liadoff be in that same boat? We might never know.

David


I have a theory, David: Maybe the metronome marking is wrong. :roll:

_________________
Richard Willmer
"Please do not shoot the pianist
He is doing his best."
Oscar Wilde: Impressions of America: Leadville


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Tue Aug 02, 2011 3:38 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 2003
Location: U.S.A.
Hi Richard,

I thought of that possibility too. What drew me away from it though is that writing in metronome markings was not an occasional thing with Liadoff. He did it a lot, which lead me to believe that he gave tempos considerable thought and was more likely meticulous about his markings.

David

_________________
"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Tue Aug 02, 2011 3:43 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2010 7:28 am
Posts: 1250
Location: Springfield, Missouri, USA
richard66 wrote:
Rachfan wrote:
Hi Eddy,

That's an interesting explanation of the human heartbeat. And yes, your thought of a study to correlated tempo with physiolgics would be fascinating. I'm trying to think of another piece that I've played at M a quarter = 42, and it eludes me. I can't tell you how I "itched" to just disregard it, as I was really straining to appreciate the music playing it so slowly while desperate to make it convincing too. Maybe this piece is actually meant as an etude, not a prelude. :lol: But as I described in my explanation, I felt that I had thought of a plausible supporting rationale that might explain Liadoff's intention, thus decided to play it as he wished. Whether it will be appreciated remains to be seen. I would bet that over the decades many have taken some significant liberties with that tempo. It is fact, of course, that many composers, like Brahms, were careful to include metronome markings and then when performing the pieces themselves totally disregarded their own markings, and when asked about it, just casually brushed it off. Could Liadoff be in that same boat? We might never know.

David


I have a theory, David: Maybe the metronome marking is wrong. :roll:

It wouldn't be the first time (or the last). Heck, sometimes they can't even get the notes right. And then there's the outlandish fingering suggestions and the very poor phrasing slurs as if they didn't even understand the language of music! What's a little numeric at the beginning going to matter? Thank God there are pianists to interpret composer scratch, otherwise we would all play everything the same (or strive to). :mrgreen:

_________________
Eddy M. del Rio, MD
"A smattering will not do. They must know all the keys, major and minor, and they must literally 'know them backwards.'" - Josef Lhevinne


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Tue Aug 02, 2011 8:52 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 2003
Location: U.S.A.
Hi Eddy,

Here are some thoughts:

I agree with your points about the importance of the interpreter vis-a-vis the composer. A couple of things I've noticed: 1) Some composers, judging by their playing of their own music, do not fully realize the potential within their music; and 2) I believe that over time a pianist comes to understand and know a piece far better than the composer ever did. The reason is fairly obvious. The composer often works on a piece or several compositions simultaneously. (Prokofiev usually had up to a dozen manuscripts open on his work table at all times and would walk around the table making notations from one to the next.) Once the composer bundles the finished score off to the publisher, he starts a new project, or turns attention to others in progress. So relatively speaking, the composer's encounter with the music during its creation was limited and in many cases even brief. Of course there are major exceptions, such as Brahms and his First Symphony, but I'm referring more to the norm.

In contrast the encounter(s) by the interpreter can be many as long as a lifetime. The pianist analyzes the piece for form, structure, style, composing idiom, characterization, figuration, melody and harmony, voice leading, best phrasing, voicing of chords, effective pedaling, dynamics, nuances, expression in all its guises, practical fingerings, and on and on. Moreover, in restudying a piece, a pianist often gains new insights into the composition and implications for its performance. Contrast that with this astonished (and astonishing) retort by Scriabin when a friend mentioned his virtuosic Fantasy, Op. 28 and Scriabin, looking totally surprised, exclaimed, "What?! I wrote a fantasy?" :lol:

Any score is the paper map drawn by the composer, but it's the interpreter who depicts the actual territory for the listener. The artist must usually give the composer the benefit of the doubt while making decisions on interpretation; however, he or she must also reserve the right to question certain points as supported by general music theory, principles of pianism, musicological research, and, most importantly, specific evidence within the score itself in order to decide and justify certain matters of execution. In the standard repertoire, performances practices are helpful as guidelines, but not to the extent of smothering the inspiration of the pianist. Unless the pianist has a reasonable amount of latitude and autonomy, then any rendition will be commonplace, predictable, and perhaps boring too. Thus there must be some leeway for allowing some individuality to be manifested by the pianist, but only as long as it is always in good taste and respectful of musical style.

David

_________________
"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


Last edited by Rachfan on Tue Aug 02, 2011 11:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Tue Aug 02, 2011 9:35 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2010 7:28 am
Posts: 1250
Location: Springfield, Missouri, USA
Rachfan wrote:
Hi Eddy,

Here are some thoughts:

I agree with your points about the importance of the interpreter vis-a-vis the composer. A couple of things I've noticed: 1) Some composers, judging by their playing of their own music, do not fully realize the potential within their music; and 2) I believe that over time a pianist comes to understand and know a piece far better than the composer ever did. The reason is fairly obvious. The composer often works on a piece or several compositions simultaneously. (Prokofiev usually had up to a dozen manuscripts open on his work table at all times and would walk around the table making notations from one to the next.) Once the composer bundles the finished score off to the publisher, he starts a new project, or turns attention to others in progress. So relatively speaking, the composer's encounter with the music during its creation was limited and in many cases even brief. Of course there are major exceptions, such as Brahms and his First Symphony, but I'm referring more to the norm.

In contrast the encounter(s) by the interpreter can be many as long as a lifetime. The pianist analyzes the piece for form, structure, style, composing idiom, characterization, figuration, melody and harmony, voice leading, best phrasing, voicing of chords, effective pedaling, dynamics, nuances, expression in all its guises, practical fingerings, and on and on. Moreover, in restudying a piece, a pianist often gains new insights into the composition and implications for its performance. Contrast that with this astonished (and astonishing) retort by Scriabin when a friend mentioned his virtuosic Fantasy, Op. 28 and Scriabin, looking totally surprised, exclaimed, "What?! I wrote a fantasy?" :lol:

Any score is the paper map drawn by the composer, but it's the interpreter who depicts the actual territory for the listener. The artist must most usually give the composer the benefit of the doubt while making decisions on interpretation; however, he or she must also reserve the right to question certain points as supported by both general music theory, principles of pianism, musicological research, and, most importantly, specific evidence within the score itself in order to decide and justify certain matters of execution. In the standard repertoire, performances practices are helpful as guidelines, but not to the extent of smothering the inspiration of the pianist. Unless the pianist has a reasonable amount of latitude and autonomy, then any rendition will be commonplace, predictable, and perhaps boring too. Thus there must be some leeway for allowing some individuality to be manifested by the pianist, but only as long as it is always in good taste and respectful of musical style.

David

David, this kind of writing on your part will do nothing but prove that you are just a man and musician of tremendous insight and experience, one who understands the process of creation and re-creation within the domain of the most abstract of human arts.
You had better be careful! :wink:
Truely, I couldn't (and didn't) express it as well as you did.
(So after all is said and done, 1/4-note=42 it is)

_________________
Eddy M. del Rio, MD
"A smattering will not do. They must know all the keys, major and minor, and they must literally 'know them backwards.'" - Josef Lhevinne


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Tue Aug 02, 2011 10:56 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 2003
Location: U.S.A.
Hi Eddy,

You're too kind in your praise, and in a way I felt very wealthy reading it. Thanks so much!

Ah yes, the 1/4 = 42. Today I was thinking maybe I should do another recording of that piece and play it as if Liadoff had never stated a tempo or MM marking. It would be quite different, I'm sure. What stops me is that element of simplicity I had mentioned previously. I fear that a different approach might rob the piece of that very simplicity, and in doing so, rob Liadoff of his genius. Best to leave it be as you suggest.

Thanks again.

David

_________________
"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 3:28 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 27, 2010 1:11 am
Posts: 243
Location: Adelaide, Australia
David, thank you for posting these. I've gained a new respect for a composer I've largely ignored in the past--this is a wonderful discovery.

The interaction between composers and interpreters is endlessly fascinating. I think it's instructive to compare music with other art forms, especially theatre. How many productions of Shakespeare have you seen where people think nothing of the action being set in the wrong century? Yet we pianists sweat over a tiny little metronome mark.

I'd like to make two specific comments about your performance of these pieces. Regarding op 24/1 my first thought on seeing the score (thanks to imslp.org) was that it should unfold slowly, like someone revealing a secret--it reminds me of the Hugo Wolf song Verborgenheit. So I don't mind the slow metronome mark in this case. But at a faster tempo it could take on a fresher air, almost like an opening scene of a Tchaikovsky ballet--as you say, a sense of expectation. However, to make this interpretation work, your rendition must be much less "vertical"--I feel that the chords get in the way a little--you need to focus on shaping the melody, and make the inner voices much quieter.

Opus 40/3 is indeed a little cryptic. It makes more sense in the context of opus 40 as a whole: it's the moment of repose between two much livelier pieces. I'd like to draw your attention here to the phrase lengths. It starts with a four bar phrase, then six bars in one phrase; later it's broken up into shorter segments. You need just a little bit more rubato (without being tasteless) to bind the long phrases together. You do slow down a little at the end of a phrase and breathe very nicely, but what's missing is a slight forward movement in the middle of the phrase. Imagine someone singing this melody, what an effort it would be to do bars 5-10 in one breath at this slow tempo: surely they would naturally flow a little more, especially leading to the E flat in bar 8 (which is not the end of the phrase!) Then the changing phrase lengths later on help to give a sense of direction.

musical-md wrote:
Rachfan wrote:
It's marked lento, a quarter = 42
...It would be a fascinating study (IMO) to study the tempos of music to see if there are some that are outside "physiologic." Can a pattern be too slow or too fast to fall within the scope of human appreciation? Certainly this is true with frequency of sound. Just because a metronome can go as slow as the 40s does that mean that music (a strictly human affair) does also?

Of course when you're playing at quarter=42, you have to ask whether the audience is really hearing it at 42, or whether they perceive a tempo of eighth=84. (Likewise, if you're playing quarter=176, are people actually hearing half note=88?)

After much experimentation, my current opinion is that performers should be able to feel a beat as slow as 30, in order to sustain a sense of line in slow movements. I'm sometimes frustrated that standard metronomes don't go slower than 40, and occasionally turn my computer to make a click track at a slower tempo. But of course the audience isn't obliged to feel the music the same way I do.

_________________
Alexander Hanysz, http://hanysz.net


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 4:39 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 2003
Location: U.S.A.
Hi hanysz,

Thank you for that very thoughtful critique!

Regarding 24/1, I found it to be an unusual piece. In fact, at first I had some difficulty characterizing it. I believe that these preludes are seldom recorded, so this is one of those cases where I had to develop an original concept. On the tempo, I played it a bit faster than 1/4 =50, but I take it you would play it faster yet. At first I did, but became perhaps overly concerned with Liadoff's metronome marking, so pulled back a bit. But I think my instinct there was similar to yours, and perhaps should have gone with it. I was certainly mindful of the chords really being horizontal in nature with the melody in the top line, so voiced it accordingly. But perhaps I could have worked more on quieting the lower harmonic voices in those chords. I don't disagree there.

Op. 43, I believe, is clearly a lament, so that's the way I tried to musically portray it. I was always very good at accompanying singers, and never missed a breath--ever. In this lament, however, I was feeling the tempo as very constraining. At M = 42 even the 8th notes melody seemed to be plodding along making it difficult to be as expressive as I would have liked to have been. I think if I were to quicken the tempo, the piece and rubatos would flow more naturally and convincingly. Maybe I should really submit a new recording. I've been going back and forth on that.

David

_________________
"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 5:12 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2010 7:28 am
Posts: 1250
Location: Springfield, Missouri, USA
hanysz wrote:
Of course when you're playing at quarter=42, you have to ask whether the audience is really hearing it at 42, or whether they perceive a tempo of eighth=84. (Likewise, if you're playing quarter=176, are people actually hearing half note=88?)

After much experimentation, my current opinion is that performers should be able to feel a beat as slow as 30, in order to sustain a sense of line in slow movements.


Excellent point above, Alexander. As soon as I read "beat as slow as 30" I naturally started marking a beat every 2 seconds, and that is certainly a very appreciable tempo.

_________________
Eddy M. del Rio, MD
"A smattering will not do. They must know all the keys, major and minor, and they must literally 'know them backwards.'" - Josef Lhevinne


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 10:31 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 2003
Location: U.S.A.
Yes, that is a very good point. When you look through the other end of the telescope, you sometimes find a new perspective.

David

_________________
"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2011 2:56 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Oct 11, 2008 4:17 pm
Posts: 418
Location: Boston
Hello David,

Another nice set indeed! I wonder how many set of Preludes did Liadoff write? Do they follow the circle of 5ths? Since you're accumulating several of these Preludes, would you ever record a complete set of Preludes? It would be great to have "a" set of something recorded, like Monica and Chris did with the Mazurkas. I'd like to do that with the Chopin Preludes someday, I only have learn Nos. 1, 5, 13, 21. I really liked the Op.11/1 Prelude, wonderful melodic line, although the ending sounds unexpected. What a great discovery with these works, and wonderful playing as usual...

George

_________________
"Nobility of spirit has more to do with simplicity than ostentation, wisdom rather than wealth, commitment rather than ambition." ~Riccardo Muti


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2011 3:54 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 2003
Location: U.S.A.
Hi George,

It appears to me that Liadoff's preludes were not a single organized effort, rather Liadoff seemed to compose them when the spirit moved him. In all he wrote 31 preludes between 1876 and 1906 that I know of. The very last one was a bit different being titled "Prelude-Pastorale". Actually neither of the two groups of four I played were "sets". They typically fall into three categories: 1) a standalone prelude with its own opus number; 2) sets of two, three or four preludes; and 3) sets containing a prelude with other character pieces or dance forms such as mazurkas. In my case I chose preludes that were lyrical, as they most appealed to me. I did eight in all and it's probably doubtful I will do a set (but never say never), as I've already moved on to another composer. But here's the good news: I believe Chris will be working up a set soon, but again, bear in mind that some sets contain a preludes along with non-preludes (I just coined a new word there. :lol:). In the meantime, if you go to YouTube, you can watch Koji Attwood play the Four Preludes of Op. 46, whereas I only played No. 4. I think he has the only set there.

For these pieces I purchased The Well-Tempered Press edition that collects all and only the preludes from the many opus numbers and consolidates them into two volumes. It was a very convenient way of accessing them. Plus I didn't have to squint at pdf files which is my usual fate in playing off-the-beaten-path music.

The ending of Op. 11, No. 1 is actually a very concise recapitulation or reprise of the main theme. It is unexpected, as you say, as it boldly asserts itself at first, but then the following notes softly drift away punctuated by a soft chord in the bass at the end. It can easily fake out the listener who was expecting more music. I think it's unusual, but a clever and effective device.

I'm really glad you enjoyed these pieces so much! Others who are hearing them have written to me including a teacher who has already assigned one of the preludes to a student and plans to use more of Liadoff's music with others. These pieces aren't a discovery, but they haven't been getting as much play as they deserve, so many people find them new and refreshing. I cannot think of anything better in music than hearing a lovely piece for the first time.

Thanks for listening.

David

_________________
"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2011 3:46 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2006 12:38 pm
Posts: 8533
Rachfan wrote:
I cannot think of anything better in music than hearing a lovely piece for the first time.


Or 'playing' a lovely piece for the first time! :D

_________________
"Simplicity is the highest goal, achievable when you have overcome all difficulties." ~ Frederic Chopin

my videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/monicapiano
my personal website: http://www.monicaalianello.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2011 4:27 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Mon Jun 12, 2006 11:45 am
Posts: 9602
Location: Netherlands
Seeing that Liadov wrote sets consisting of a couple of genre pieces, mostly Preludes and Mazurkas, but occasionally other titles, it seems strange to collect only the pieces titled Prelude (or Mazurka). This was the dilemma I faced when introducing Liadov to the site. Initially I had a page for Preludes and one for Mazurkas, as is the way PS is organized - by type. But I felt that while this makes much sense for Chopin, it did not for Liadov so I changed it. So now he has a page called 'Piano Pieces' which is totally lame... but I don't see another way to to it.

Rachfan wrote:
But here's the good news: I believe Chris will be working up a set soon, but again, bear in mind that some sets contain a preludes along with non-preludes (I just coined a new word there. :lol:).

I'm not sure it is good news or not, but yes I will be submitting re-recordings of Op.10, Op.11 and Op.22 before long. On longer term I need to replace all my Liadov recordings. Indeed, be warned of the non-preludes (in this case, aka Mazurkas). But they are nice too :P

_________________
Nothing is always absolutely so -- Sturgeon's law
Chris Breemer


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2011 10:07 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 2003
Location: U.S.A.
Hi Monica,

You're absolutely right!

David

_________________
"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Sat Aug 06, 2011 5:47 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2010 6:18 pm
Posts: 1040
Hello, David,

I have finally got around to listening to these. My favourite is op 11/1, which is beautifully played and recorded. Op 31/2 is one I have been attempting for some time but never get too far. It is a bit so-so, which might explain matters a bit.

I find too much importance is attached to names and to the fact pieces are published together. Just because he had a couple of odds and ends that he stuck together and had published does not make them into a set, neither does calling a piece a prelude instead of intermezzo or interlude make much of a difference. Unless they define a form (minuet, fugue, sonata, rondo, etc), mood (Elegy, etc) or imitation (In a Boat, etc), titles in music to me have no meaning whatsoever.

_________________
Richard Willmer
"Please do not shoot the pianist
He is doing his best."
Oscar Wilde: Impressions of America: Leadville


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Sat Aug 06, 2011 7:08 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Mon Jun 12, 2006 11:45 am
Posts: 9602
Location: Netherlands
richard66 wrote:
I find too much importance is attached to names and to the fact pieces are published together. Just because he had a couple of odds and ends that he stuck together and had published does not make them into a set, neither does calling a piece a prelude instead of intermezzo or interlude make much of a difference. Unless they define a form (minuet, fugue, sonata, rondo, etc), mood (Elegy, etc) or imitation (In a Boat, etc), titles in music to me have no meaning whatsoever.

This is very true. All the same, names are all we have to categorize stuff. Unless we decide to dispense with individual pages under composers, and just list all pieces directly on the composer page. It is an attractive option, thinking about it. But too much hassle to change it all.

_________________
Nothing is always absolutely so -- Sturgeon's law
Chris Breemer


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Sat Aug 06, 2011 8:32 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 2003
Location: U.S.A.
For me finding volumes dedicated only to Liadoff's preludes was a boon in preparing these pieces. The reason? I dislike mazurkas! Otherwise, I would have had to comb through every opus on the IMSLP, including the mazukas, trying to find, separate and extract the preludes. Worked fine for me given my purpose! :) I can also understand that for other pianists taking a broader view of these pieces, that a mixed edition would be more suitable.

David

_________________
"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Sat Aug 06, 2011 8:50 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 2003
Location: U.S.A.
Hi Richard,

I too really enjoy Op. 11, No. 1. It has a very beautiful, haunting sound. As for 31/2, the issue there, of course, is managing melody and accompaniment within the same hand (RH) while layering the dynamics appropriately including those in the left hand accompaniment. When I say "issue" it raises a larger and more interesting point. Quite often in the preludes of Chopin, Liadoff, and even Rachmaninoff what I've encountered and have come to appreciate is that often these "preludes" turn out to be small etudes focusing on particular technical problems. For that reason I've always looked at them as not only an introduction to the composer's idiom, intrinsically beautiful music, and a fine way to prepare for that composer's larger pieces, but also as a way to strengthen one's piano technique in general.

Thanks for listening to these pieces.

David

_________________
"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Sat Aug 06, 2011 9:40 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Mon Jun 12, 2006 11:45 am
Posts: 9602
Location: Netherlands
Rachfan wrote:
For me finding volumes dedicated only to Liadoff's preludes was a boon in preparing these pieces. The reason? I dislike mazurkas!

Huh :!: :?: :? :roll: :shock: :x :evil:

_________________
Nothing is always absolutely so -- Sturgeon's law
Chris Breemer


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Sun Aug 07, 2011 12:00 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 2003
Location: U.S.A.
Hi Chris,

Yes, it's true, generally I dislike mazurkas except maybe two or three that Chopin wrote. When it comes to dance forms for piano, I do occasionally make an exception for a waltz, but only if it sounds sufficiently scandalous. :lol: Dvorak's dances are appealing too.

David

_________________
"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Sun Aug 07, 2011 12:39 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2010 6:18 pm
Posts: 1040
Rachfan wrote:
For me finding volumes dedicated only to Liadoff's preludes was a boon in preparing these pieces. The reason? I dislike mazurkas! Otherwise, I would have had to comb through every opus on the IMSLP, including the mazukas, trying to find, separate and extract the preludes. Worked fine for me given my purpose! :) I can also understand that for other pianists taking a broader view of these pieces, that a mixed edition would be more suitable.

David

But then a Mazurka is a defined form. While you might get away calling a prelude a romance, calling a mazurka a prelude will result in a mazurka that has been misnamed a prelude!

You are quite right: many shorter pieces make for wondeful technical studies. Just as Oswald's Il Neige is a wonderful etude on triplets. Play that piece well and never again will a triplet bother you!

_________________
Richard Willmer
"Please do not shoot the pianist
He is doing his best."
Oscar Wilde: Impressions of America: Leadville


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Sun Aug 07, 2011 4:07 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 2003
Location: U.S.A.
Hi Richard,

I would agree that it's difficult to define a 19th century prelude other than to say that it's a pianistic character piece, and in Scriabin's case, even seemingly improvisatory at times. Similarly, there would be extensive discussion on what formally constitutes an intermezzo (in the pianistic, not the operatic sense) or a moment musical of that same era or early 20th century. I cannot disagree that a mazurka, bourree, gigue, allemande, gavotte, waltz, tango, etc. each refers to a specific dance form with its own rhythmic distinctions. So yes, it would certainly be near impossible to refer to a dance form as a prelude. Yet... Bortkiewicz's Prelude 33/8 is clearly a waltz as is Debussy's character piece "La plus que lente". And Rachmaninoff's Moment Musical 16/5 is unmistakably a fine barcarolle. So, never say never! There seems to be an exception to every rule. Preludes of the romantic era are certainly well appreciated though. I've never heard anyone complain about hearing Chopin's 24 played in succession!

David

_________________
"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Sun Aug 07, 2011 4:25 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Mon Jun 12, 2006 11:45 am
Posts: 9602
Location: Netherlands
Rachfan wrote:
I've never heard anyone complain about hearing Chopin's 24 played in succession!

Unless someone happens to dislike preludes :P

_________________
Nothing is always absolutely so -- Sturgeon's law
Chris Breemer


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Sun Aug 07, 2011 8:53 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 2003
Location: U.S.A.
Hi,

True, but I've just not encountered one yet, although I probably don't get out much. :lol:

David

_________________
"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Sun Aug 07, 2011 10:37 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2010 6:18 pm
Posts: 1040
Add me to the list of the Chopin Preludes. 24 are too many all in a row. I lose count after the 10th and then always hope the next one is the last! :D

_________________
Richard Willmer
"Please do not shoot the pianist
He is doing his best."
Oscar Wilde: Impressions of America: Leadville


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2011 11:50 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 2003
Location: U.S.A.
Hi Richard,

The reason you're losing count is because you only have 10 fingers. If you're going to listen to the entire Chopin Op. 28, a good strategy would be to bring along to the recital a miniature pocket abacus and then move a bead after each prelude. This would also be ideal for long sets of variations. I tell you it will work famously. :lol: :wink: Just joking.

David

_________________
"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2011 1:45 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Jun 27, 2009 3:32 pm
Posts: 499
Location: Connecticut, USA
Hi David,

Very nice playing of IMO a highly underrated composer. I'm actually not very familiar with Liadov's music, but what I've heard I've really liked, starting with that nice little bon-bon The Musical Snuffbox. He seems a master of small forms, especially the character piece. These preludes seem impressionistic in spirit (I thought I heard flashes of Debussy) with some typical Russian chromatic harmony thrown in. That last one is probably my favorite -- a beautiful, vaguely melancholy, Russian tune.

Regarding the playing, I particularly liked your phrasing at the end of the middle two preludes and your overall sensitivity to the harmonic changes. Very nice too, that you keep an accurate rhythmic pulse. Perhaps there are a few places you could have a bit more freedom -- sometimes it almost seems to sounds a bit too metronomic to me and could use more rubato -- but we know that my tastes in rubato are not everyone's :P

Very good playing! Thanks for introducing us to these pieces.

Joe

_________________
Movie Blog: http://www.criticsloft.com
Classical Music Web Site: http://www.critics-ear.com
Youtube Piano Videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/Chopin849?feature=mhee


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2011 4:10 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 2003
Location: U.S.A.
Hi Joe,

Thanks for listening and commenting. It's true that Liadoff mostly preferred working in small forms. And there are obviously some gorgeous pieces in his oevre. When it came to large forms, he did show his potential in works like "The Enchanted Lake" for orchestra. But his biggest obstacle was indolence and procrastination. He couldn't stay on task and schedule, so he didn't achieve as much at that end of the musical spectrum. For example, he left unfinished a ballet suite. I truly think that Liadoff doubted his own capabilities--he didn't believe in himself. Getting back to his piano music, I've been most impressed by Liadoff's sense and treatment of polyphony. There are times when the accompaniment transforms a piece to a melodic duet resulting in interesting textures and voice leading.

I haven't studied with artist teachers since 1993, and have been communing with the composers since then. When I delve into the composing idiom of a composer whose music is new to me, immediately I wonder what that composer will teach me about playing the piano. And I must say, the teachings of Bortkiewicz, Catoire, Medtner and Liadoff (and now Glazunoff) have been invaluable.

On that last prelude that you mention, in retrospect, in the same way that Chopin's Prelude No. 7 in A is probably the most terrifying of Op. 28, this Liadoff Prelude Op. 40, No. 3 similarly has a very transparent texture. For the pianist, there's no place to hide there! The tempo is a very slow lento, and seems like a child's lament. I admit that I was tempted to ignore the tempo marking, play the piece adagio, and give it a more sensuous sound. But its hallmark is its very simplicity, so I decided to honor the composer's wishes and play it as written. I'm glad I did because as I've listened to it a few times since, it has grown on me.

Yes, you're quite right, I could have definitely employed more rubato in places. I spent only the time necessary to make these recordings. If I were to live with these pieces longer, I'm positive there would be more rubato in my playing of these works.

Thanks for your compliment on my playing!

David

_________________
"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Sun Aug 21, 2011 11:36 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jan 20, 2008 5:45 pm
Posts: 2815
Location: Germany
Hi David,
I have enjoyed your performances of these little gems very much. Your playing is great and expressive and you seem perfectly to capture the right atmosphere of these pieces!
To op. 11: You bring out the "waves" of cresc.-decresc. very well. The figures in bar 67 and parallel before seem quite complicated to me, but I think, it´s right to play the two thirytysecond-notes of the upper voice after the bass-figure.
To op. 24: That´s a true enlightening miniature. The up-going eigths have something touching for me. Great playing!
To op. 31: This one has a bit of the Chopin-prelude with the same title (Largo), isn´t it? A deep and moving piece and your performance deserves absolutely the same attributes.
To op. 42: a chromatic arabasque to which your contemplative and calm interpretation embraces in every aspect.

_________________
Link to my videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/musicusblau


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Sun Aug 21, 2011 6:35 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 2003
Location: U.S.A.
Hi Andreas,

I'm glad you could listen to these recordings and I very much value your compliments!

In 11/1 I decided to play it the challenging way. That is, instead of keeping the LH subdued while letting the RH do the cresc.-dimin. effects, I knew it would be more dramatic for both hands to participate in that way--but it would also be more difficult to restrain the LH enough so as not to drown out the RH, where the LH is in a lower and more powerful register. Much attention went to balancing the hands properly. There were a couple of measures where it was a struggle for the RH to prevail, but it pretty much worked overall. Yes I too wondered about those two pesky 32nd notes you mentioned, but I think it sounds OK. That entire figure is Chopinesque ornamentation.

I believe the Op. 24 has some excitement in the air. It's a very bright piece which contrasts well with the others that are more somber and melancholy.

You're absolutely correct. In regards to technique for this Op. 31 largo, I used Chopin's "Prelude" Op. 28, No. 4 in E, also largo, as the model of playing inside the keys to keep the double notes as quiet as possible. In that Chopin piece it's done for the left hand chords, but in the case of this Liadoff piece, I had to transfer that technique up to the right hand which also plays melody. It's interesting how when we learn a particular principle of pianism when we're young, we often associate it with the piece where we first encountered it. Another good example is playing a 2 against 3 polyrhythm. I always think of Grieg's "Notturno" Op. 54, No. 4.

The Op. 42, a little lament, was as scary as Chopin's "Prelude" No. 7 in A--the texture is so thin, sparse and simple that the pianist has no place to hide there. And trying to maintain a good legato at a very slow lento with passing tones limiting the pedal at times--a lot of work!

I'm glad I looked into this music of Liadoff. It impresses me in many ways. Thanks again, Andreas! :)

David

_________________
"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2011 8:40 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jan 20, 2008 5:45 pm
Posts: 2815
Location: Germany
Hi David,
I see you have made a lot of profound and elaborated notions of playing the fast figures in the first piece and also all the other preludes in general. That´s what one hears thoroughly. All is elaborated and well felt, so that your interpretations seem convincingly and they are a great enjoyment to listen to.
Yes, I also often think of certain pieces I have learned as a teenager when I am confronted with certain musical phenomenons. F.ex. when I see 3 eights against 4 in polyrhythm structure I always think of Chopin´s "Fantaisie-Impromptu", which I have practised a lot when I was fourteen or fifteen. I also think with such "basic pieces" we do learn a lot we can benefit from our whole life. It´s a nice matter of music, that many structural phenomenons repeat and we can gain the more experience the more pieces we play. :D You for me are one of the best examples of a pianist with a good and great experience!

_________________
Link to my videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/musicusblau


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Liadoff, four more Preludes, Opp. 11/1, 24/1, 31/2 & 40/3
PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 12:29 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 2003
Location: U.S.A.
Hi Andreas,

Quote:
You for me are one of the best examples of a pianist with a good and great experience!


You are way too kind, but thanks so much for that! :)

David

_________________
"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 45 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 1 hour


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group