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 Post subject: Re: Ravel, A la maniere de... Chabrier
PostPosted: Thu Apr 21, 2011 2:21 am 
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Location: Boston
Hello David. Great job on a very convincing miniature - I mean that in a grand way! :D I am a big fan of Analog sound. I love that golden sound of LPs. Hey, I use a home-made tube amplifier for my bedroom. If the piano was mostly in tune, then some of the "out of tune" sound might be due to the wow and flutter from tape recorders, especially if they were spec'd above 0.15%, or if you used cardiod mics too close with a less than ideal off-axis response - as some notes are in perfect tune, and some are not.

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 Post subject: Re: Ravel, A la maniere de... Chabrier
PostPosted: Thu Apr 21, 2011 6:35 am 
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Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 1958
Location: U.S.A.
Hi George,

Chris and Monica were kind enough to put up these two Ravel recordings for me. Your observations are correct. Back in the days I used a Nakamichi CR-2/CR-1 two-head cassette tape deck, two close-in Nakamichi MD-300 electret small diaphragm electret condenser mics (with the batteries in the mics) with cardioid capsules and a third mic behind them but with an omni-directional capsule for ambient sound. So there was probably more wow and flutter on that tape deck than would have been the case with reel-to reel. Also, I was mis-advised and should never have been doing close-in recordings at the rim of the piano, as they're more appropriate for jazz and pops. Apart from those issues though, analog sound was definitely warmer and richer than digital sound. As far as digital recording goes, I think my current setup is far superior to the old equipment, more compact, has more headroom, and delivers a natural, uncolored sound.

David

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 Post subject: Re: Ravel, A la maniere de... Chabrier
PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2011 5:01 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jan 20, 2008 5:45 pm
Posts: 2815
Location: Germany
Rachfan wrote:
Quote:
When I hear Chabrier's "Bourree fantasque", I can easily hear Poulenc at the same time.


Thank you for that interesting inspiration, David, I will try to get a recording of that piece. :D

Quote:
Poulenc has many different moods and moments in his composing as you well know. He can be charming, witty, sarcastic, pensive, matter-of-fact, romantic, urbane, ironic, nostalgic and more--very expressive to say the least. And in the larger scope of styles, you're right. He can display neoclassicism and in short order neo-romanticism too. He was eclectic and versatile, which is why he is probably one of the standouts of the Six.


Yes, I agree absolutely. His style seems so versatile (and eclectic, too). The second theme of the first movement of the Sonata for clarinet and piano, which is much slower than the first theme and the reprise, by the way, seems neo-romantic to me, indeed! May be "neo-romantic" characterizes his style in the first and second movement still adequater than "neo-classical". I like his individual and very expressive style very much!

Quote:
Hopefully you can post his sonata for clarinet and piano here. I'm sure many would love to hear it, I know I would.


Thank you, David. I will do my very best (like the buttler in "Dinner for one" :lol: , sorry, I always have to think of that end, when I hear this english sentence :wink: ) and I will probably play that sonata with two clarinetists, first with a pupil and second with my colleague, I also have recorded the jazz-pieces recently. So, we have a double chance to get a recording here. :wink:

Quote:
Today we don't hear much of Chabrier, but I believe that in his time he was a very prominent presence in 19th century French music circles.


So, it´s your special and valuable merit, that you have made him here alive to us! Thank you once more. :!:

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 Post subject: Re: Ravel, A la maniere de... Chabrier
PostPosted: Sat Apr 23, 2011 5:16 am 
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Hi Andreas,

Quote:
I will try to get a recording of that piece


There are several on YouTube.

Quote:
you have made him here alive to us! Thank you once more.


It's always a great pleasure!

David

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 Post subject: Re: Ravel, A la maniere de... Chabrier
PostPosted: Sat Apr 23, 2011 2:51 pm 
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Poulenc has the knack of imitating witout ever sounding derivative. Does not the slow movment of the piano concerto sound like it might have been written by Mozart before progressing to a more modern idiom without ever sounding like patchwork, but like the logical conclusion of the first statement.

He is a world apart from Stravinsky, who has yet to convince me of the validity of his Pulcinella, for example.

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 Post subject: Re: Ravel, A la maniere de... Chabrier
PostPosted: Sat Apr 23, 2011 4:24 pm 
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Hi Richard,

Yes, I think that Poulenc, being very improvisatory in his approach to composing could drop into Baroque for a few moments, neo-classicism along the way, and then have moments of unbridled romanticism. Yet, he would always do these changes in style with a great deal of originality and cleverness. Another composer who comes to mind was Doynanyi who could regale listeners with such imitations using parody-like paraphrases. The American composer Amy Beach too was able to incorporate some lengthy Baroque moments into her otherwise late romantic style in chamber works, and did so very convincingly. Not all of the composers are capable in doing this in my opinion or have the inclination to do so. I think it's probably a special talent.

David

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