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 Post subject: Re: Curious site
PostPosted: Sat Mar 12, 2011 11:33 pm 
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Strange! Chris, your post two above this one (quoting me), is listing it as if it were me posting and quoting you! What happened? :?

Edit: Further, I now observed that both an origial reply to Richard by me (that I never saw posted), and a replacement for same, do not appear! Something is going on. :evil:

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 Post subject: Re: Curious site
PostPosted: Sun Mar 13, 2011 12:19 am 
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pianolady wrote:
Just wondering....Is there any piano music written for three hands?

I can't think of any. I've played piano music for 6, 16 or 32 (!) hands, but not for any odd number bigger than 1.

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 Post subject: Re: Curious site
PostPosted: Sun Mar 13, 2011 3:37 am 
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This is further off topic but ... the strangest piece of music I ever performed was Satie's Vexations. As I remember it, it was about two lines of music with the instruction to repeat it 840(?) times. It was performed on an all-nighter as part of a modern music observance. Pianists were individually signed up for a 10-minute performing slot (with 5 minutes "on-deck" prior), and the performers would swap out without interruption of the performance. The stranger part was that the cultural elite of Cincinnati would come and listen to this for long stretches of time.

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Eddy M. del Rio, MD
"A smattering will not do. They must know all the keys, major and minor, and they must literally 'know them backwards.'" - Josef Lhevinne


Last edited by musical-md on Sun Mar 13, 2011 3:40 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Curious site
PostPosted: Sun Mar 13, 2011 3:39 am 
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hanysz wrote:
pianolady wrote:
Just wondering....Is there any piano music written for three hands?

I can't think of any. I've played piano music for 6, 16 or 32 (!) hands, but not for any odd number bigger than 1.


Wasn't there something that Haydn or Mozart wrote that required use of two hands and one nose?

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Eddy M. del Rio, MD
"A smattering will not do. They must know all the keys, major and minor, and they must literally 'know them backwards.'" - Josef Lhevinne


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 Post subject: Re: Curious site
PostPosted: Sun Mar 13, 2011 5:29 am 
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Oh well....I did a little checking and couldn't find anything written for three-hands from a main-stream composer. Although for me, sometimes I could almost consider calling music written in three staves to be 'three-hand' piano music. At least that's what I wished I had had when learning such pieces. Or maybe if only I had someone nearby who could 'lend me a hand' when I come to the difficult parts....

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 Post subject: Re: Curious site
PostPosted: Sun Mar 13, 2011 4:13 pm 
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musical-md wrote:
Wasn't there something that Haydn or Mozart wrote that required use of two hands and one nose?


Rach 2 is sometimes frivolously known as the Nose concerto (trying playing the opening, using the nose for the lower F!)


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 Post subject: Re: Curious site
PostPosted: Mon Mar 14, 2011 9:07 am 
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andrew wrote:
Rach 2 is sometimes frivolously known as the Nose concerto (trying playing the opening, using the nose for the lower F!)

I think that for normal, hands, with some practice (and pain :wink: ) these chords are manageable without rolling.

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 Post subject: Re: Curious site
PostPosted: Mon Mar 14, 2011 4:36 pm 
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The chords are no problem. It's the low F that might be played by the nose to avoid releasing the chords :roll:

Edit: BTW. Since the LH chord is more difficult than the RH chord, I release the RH chord to play the low F with m.d. How about others?

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Eddy M. del Rio, MD
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 Post subject: Re: Curious site
PostPosted: Mon Mar 14, 2011 5:02 pm 
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Er... right. I stand corrected. I was thinking of the chords because I've told my duo partner (who plays the solo part, I the orchestral part) to practice so he doesn't need to roll the chords, which IMO sounds bad.

I don't see the problem though. The chords are held by the sustain pedal, no ?

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 Post subject: Re: Curious site
PostPosted: Mon Mar 14, 2011 7:32 pm 
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techneut wrote:
Er... right. I stand corrected. I was thinking of the chords because I've told my duo partner (who plays the solo part, I the orchestral part) to practice so he doesn't need to roll the chords, which IMO sounds bad.

I don't see the problem though. The chords are held by the sustain pedal, no ?


Or the damp[f]er pedal, depending on how much purity of sound you want. I would use the damp[f]er (R) pedal, not the sustain (C) pedal.

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Eddy M. del Rio, MD
"A smattering will not do. They must know all the keys, major and minor, and they must literally 'know them backwards.'" - Josef Lhevinne


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 Post subject: Re: Curious site
PostPosted: Mon Mar 14, 2011 8:02 pm 
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musical-md wrote:
Or the damp[f]er pedal, depending on how much purity of sound you want. I would use the damp[f]er (R) pedal, not the sustain (C) pedal.

Those are the same :!: You probably thought I meant the sostenuto pedal. They're easy to confuse.

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 Post subject: Re: Curious site
PostPosted: Mon Mar 14, 2011 11:06 pm 
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techneut wrote:
musical-md wrote:
Or the damp[f]er pedal, depending on how much purity of sound you want. I would use the damp[f]er (R) pedal, not the sustain (C) pedal.

Those are the same :!: You probably thought I meant the sostenuto pedal. They're easy to confuse.

Yes, and I could have used Sostenuto (Italian for sustain) for more clarity.

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Eddy M. del Rio, MD
"A smattering will not do. They must know all the keys, major and minor, and they must literally 'know them backwards.'" - Josef Lhevinne


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 Post subject: Re: Curious site
PostPosted: Mon Mar 14, 2011 11:44 pm 
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techneut wrote:
I was thinking of the chords because I've told my duo partner (who plays the solo part, I the orchestral part) to practice so he doesn't need to roll the chords, which IMO sounds bad.


If your partner's hands aren't big enough to stretch the chords, then practicing isn't likely to make a difference.

For what it's worth, I have a recording of Rachmaninoff himself playing this concerto, and he breaks those chords (not exactly rolled, but with the bottom note played separately before the others).

We seem to have wandered off topic again...

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 Post subject: Re: Curious site
PostPosted: Tue Mar 15, 2011 12:34 pm 
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hanysz wrote:
If your partner's hands aren't big enough to stretch the chords, then practicing isn't likely to make a difference.

I don't agree with that. My experience is that you can achieve a lot with gradually accustoming the hands to cruel stretches and finding your way around the front of the keys. I can take chords now that I could not a couple of years ago. It might not work for everybody though.

hanysz wrote:
We seem to have wandered off topic again...
As we always do. Shame on the moderators for not keeping the topics on topic :lol:

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 Post subject: Re: Curious site
PostPosted: Tue Mar 15, 2011 3:04 pm 
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musical-md wrote:
richard66 wrote:
I agree with you there, Eddy, but could you possibly detect from a recording if the pianist is using one or two hands?

Actually, yes. And I think you could too. It would be detected by never hearing anything that was impossible to play with only one hand. Similar to when one realizes that they are listening to 2-piano music: "What's that? That not possible! Ah, it's 2 pianos!"


Richard, (This is my 3rd and last attempt to post the following) I had misunderstood you. No, I certainly could not tell whether a pianist is using one or two hands in a performance of a one-hand work. What I had meant, was that I believe it would be possible to tell if the work was composed for one hand only.


Edit: more specifically, "recording" for "performance."

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Eddy M. del Rio, MD
"A smattering will not do. They must know all the keys, major and minor, and they must literally 'know them backwards.'" - Josef Lhevinne


Last edited by musical-md on Tue Mar 15, 2011 6:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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