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 Post subject: Re: Geyer diehard
PostPosted: Tue Feb 22, 2011 7:52 pm 
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richard66 wrote:
Here you are. I bet a piece of cheese that now the melody is competing with the background.

The LH is a bit more prominent than would be ideal, but not disturbingly so. Better this way than that you try to play so softly that you lose notes.
Personally I'd sooner put this up than the previous version. Nice ending, and a tasteful ritenuto at 0:58. Never be afraid to take your time between phrases. As long as it doesn't sound like a sudden hesitation.

My only remaining concern is how you handle bars 10 and 20. Not only do you not slightly hold back here, as I think would be appropriate but you actually shorten these bars by almost 25%. One thing that helps in bars with longer note values is counting the shorter values. Tap along with the 16ths until you get to bar 10 and you'll see my point. The longer the notes are, the greater the temptation to move on prematurely, and the more important the internal counting becomes. A lesson I'd had to learn the hard way accompanying the church singing on organ. I know that some professial players still do that counting as a matter of principle.

Now before you get totally frustrated with us I think we should accept this one now, along with the Bortkiewicz and Camilleri. Chances are you'll want to redo the Arietta after having put it to rest for a while.

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 Post subject: Re: Geyer diehard
PostPosted: Tue Feb 22, 2011 8:00 pm 
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...which means time to get your bio and photo ready!

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 Post subject: Re: Geyer diehard
PostPosted: Tue Feb 22, 2011 8:01 pm 
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Hi Richard,

That's a very good performance tip Chris gives on holding/counting long note values. I think I learned that principle early on, but later in life I relearned it big time in playing Debussy's Prelude from Book I, "Danseuses de Delphes" where as I recall you must count in 12's!

Welcome to Piano Society!

David

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 Post subject: Re: Geyer diehard
PostPosted: Wed Feb 23, 2011 12:54 am 
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Chris' comment to Richard:
Quote:
My only remaining concern is how you handle bars 10 and 20. Not only do you not slightly hold back here, as I think would be appropriate but you actually shorten these bars by almost 25%. One thing that helps in bars with longer note values is counting the shorter values. Tap along with the 16ths until you get to bar 10 and you'll see my point. The longer the notes are, the greater the temptation to move on prematurely, and the more important the internal counting becomes. A lesson I'd had to learn the hard way accompanying the church singing on organ. I know that some professial players still do that counting as a matter of principle.


You know what I say: Try a metronome! :mrgreen:

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 Post subject: Re: Geyer diehard
PostPosted: Wed Feb 23, 2011 2:16 am 
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Rachfan wrote:
The accompaniment isn't bad at all in this recording, yet might be still softer, but the Geyer is the Geyer. My sense is that this is about as good as it can be given the foibles of the instrument.


I think that's fair comment. My suspicion is that it would take Michelangeli-esque touch to make the instrument sound good (no offence meant!) To Richard: I'd suggest that one day, just for your own amusement (nothing to do with this forum), take the same piece and go to a piano showroom, ostensibly to try out the instruments, record it and see how much better it sounds on a quality piano. Having put this much effort into playing on a questionable instrument, I think you will be quite pleased when you hear the results elsewhere.


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 Post subject: Re: Geyer diehard
PostPosted: Wed Feb 23, 2011 3:25 am 
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andrew wrote:
take the same piece and go to a piano showroom, ostensibly to try out the instruments, record it and see how much better it sounds on a quality piano. Having put this much effort into playing on a questionable instrument, I think you will be quite pleased when you hear the results elsewhere.
And bring your recorder with you! I remember one of our members went to a piano showroom with a video-camera and filmed herself playing three or four different pieces.

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 Post subject: Re: Geyer diehard
PostPosted: Wed Feb 23, 2011 7:42 am 
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I would like to thank you for this. I do not see these recordings as definitive, of course, but now that the "entry examination" is over, maybe good things might come out. I will surely take a more relaxed attitutde to recording!

I make no pretence to be as good a pianist as most of you here are (Monica, Adrienne, David, Alexander, Eddy, Chris, Andrew and others whose name escape me now) but I do hope my association with you will help me to improve. Your nitpicking as you call it is at times essential. I am sure I would not have reached the modest levels that I have reached if it were not for your criticism and suggestions. I just hope now I will able to work on other pieces and that these will give pleasure to visitors to the site and to offer encouragement to other pianists who might be too afraid to try their luck. It is remarkeable the progress one can achieve if only there is an aim and here the aim is to give pleasure to others and maybe encourage my small daughter to move a bit further than just going boing boing boing on the keys.

I hope to get a better piano when circumstances here change, as they will soon. I cannot say I will get that Fazioli 6' but anyway.

musical-md wrote:
Chris' comment to Richard:
Quote:
My only remaining concern is how you handle bars 10 and 20. Not only do you not slightly hold back here, as I think would be appropriate but you actually shorten these bars by almost 25%. One thing that helps in bars with longer note values is counting the shorter values. Tap along with the 16ths until you get to bar 10 and you'll see my point. The longer the notes are, the greater the temptation to move on prematurely, and the more important the internal counting becomes. A lesson I'd had to learn the hard way accompanying the church singing on organ. I know that some professial players still do that counting as a matter of principle.


You know what I say: Try a metronome! :mrgreen:


Chris says... Tap along!! 8) I actually stopped the clock to record, to avoid tick tack tick tack cuckoo in the background! And yes, I was counting, but it seems not enough and surely I did not want "one and two and three and...." to be on the take! Or I ended up counting some bars at the speed of the first recordings and the others at the speed of some of the later ones.

Your suggestion is good, Monica and Andrew. I do go now and then. One shop keeps its pianos in a big underground vault. What a noise! I went there once and tried a Kawai but was not tempted to buy.

I have a biography. Will this do?

Code:
Richard Willmer was born in a family where music was in the order of the day. While his parents played no instrument, there were plenty of recordings and concerts at hand. Whereas the some of the classics might have been missing, there was plenty of out-of-the-way repertoire.

At the grand age of 8 Richard decided that if parents and similar liked classical music and that if brothers and friends liked popular it was a sure sign classical music was for old-timers and if you were young you were pop. Passing years brought wisdom and at the venerable age of 12 he decided to give classical music a try. After a month he was seen at school selling his collection of pop to the highest bidder.

Encouraged by an older brother who began learning the guitar and by the presence in the house of the first flautist of the local symphony orchestra, he took up the treble recorder. His repertoire included Loeillet, Telemann, Marcello, Handel and Pez.

When he was 18 another brother bought a 19th century Pleyel which proved impossible to tune. To cut a long story short, a teacher was found, a graduate from the Paris Conservatoire, and in a few months he was reading Mozart’s sonatas. A home was found for the Pleyel and a Baldwin was bought instead. A small but steady repertoire began to be built, including Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Grieg, Schubert, Albeniz, Gershwin, Shostakovich and Granados.

After graduating in Law Richard left home and travelled extensively, living for a time in Florence, Paris and London. No piano was available, though there were periods when he could practise here and there and for a time he rented a Baldwin. He tried to maintain his repertoire but neglected to learn any new pieces.

In 2007 he married, rented a piano and began dusting his repertoire. In 2010, after hearing for the first time the works of Sergei Bortkiewicz, he decided it was time to learn something new and has since then become acquainted with the works of Galuppi, Field, Tcherepnin, Glinka, Mareo Albéniz and many others. He is at present struggling to master some of these pieces and hopes to be able to share them with the world in the foreseeable future.

When not practising he works for a language school, designs Internet sites and runs a landscape design school.

He and his wife have a small daughter, who sometimes helps to play the piano or sings a countermelody.

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He is doing his best."
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Last edited by richard66 on Thu Feb 24, 2011 8:04 am, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Geyer diehard
PostPosted: Wed Feb 23, 2011 8:18 pm 
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Nice to 'see' you, Richard! I also like the second photo better. And your bio is fine, although some of the wording is quite different than what I'd use. But it is your bio so if you like it this way, then that's the way it shall be.

I'll probably be the one to put you up onto the site (unless Chris wants to), but it may take me a day or so...

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 Post subject: Re: Geyer diehard
PostPosted: Wed Feb 23, 2011 9:28 pm 
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But we cannot all write the same, can we, Monica? The same as we cannot all play the same. Some are better than others. That is the way the world is. :D

Could I then take the chance to change the following:

Code:
When not practising he works for a language school and designs Internet sites.


To:

Code:
When not practising he works for a language school, designs Internet sites and runs a landscape design school.

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Richard Willmer
"Please do not shoot the pianist
He is doing his best."
Oscar Wilde: Impressions of America: Leadville


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 Post subject: Re: Geyer diehard
PostPosted: Wed Feb 23, 2011 11:34 pm 
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You can change whatever you like, but please put it all together for me so I can just copy and paste. I'm on a train now so I can't do any editing.

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 Post subject: Re: Geyer diehard
PostPosted: Thu Feb 24, 2011 8:01 am 
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I had no time yesterday but I can do it tonight.

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 Post subject: Re: Geyer diehard
PostPosted: Thu Feb 24, 2011 8:05 am 
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I have edited the biography then: all in one place!

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Richard Willmer
"Please do not shoot the pianist
He is doing his best."
Oscar Wilde: Impressions of America: Leadville


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 Post subject: Re: Geyer diehard
PostPosted: Thu Feb 24, 2011 2:13 pm 
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Chris, I uploaded the three recordings and the photo last night. If you want to finish up you can, or I'll finish it tonight-tomorrow. Either way is fine with me.

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 Post subject: Re: Geyer diehard
PostPosted: Thu Feb 24, 2011 2:24 pm 
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pianolady wrote:
Chris, I uploaded the three recordings and the photo last night. If you want to finish up you can, or I'll finish it tonight-tomorrow.

Cool, teamwork 8) I'll do the rest tonight.

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 Post subject: Re: Geyer diehard
PostPosted: Thu Feb 24, 2011 7:55 pm 
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Ok here ye go then Richard : http://server3.pianosociety.com/cms/ind ... ction=2963
Do check if everything is ok and if you're satisfied with the bio.
For now, I've put the Camilleri in the _Various page, and the Bortkiewicz in the Miscellaneous page for that composer.

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