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PostPosted: Thu Jun 25, 2009 1:33 pm 
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Ok, Andreas - I hope you survived your concert. Please tell me how it went.


Just finished reading chapter 8.

The family is in Vienna now preparing for more concerts. Humphrey is acting stranger all the time and Sam doesn't like it. But still Sam writes out more piano pieces for Humphrey, except now Humphrey argues about a certain note in one of the compositions. Sam wants to change it, but Humphrey won't allow it. Sam tells Luc that he better make Humphrey change the note or else....

So not much else happens in this chapter until the very end - Sam finds a bundle wrapped in rags lying on his bed. Must be the severed hands, right? I hope we find out soon!!!

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 25, 2009 6:47 pm 
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Hi Monica,
thank you for your kind sympathies for my school-concert. Yipiee, I have survived it! :o :lol:
Now seriously, it was real good concert, most of the pieces went very well (apart from quite little slips).
I have conducted the film-music of "The Lord of the Rings" by Howard shore, from the second part ("The two towers") and the third ("The Return of the King"). I like this symphonic music very much. Our school-orchestra consists of 26 players and we have all important instruments exept tuba and oboe at this moment. And we have only one viola, the other voices for viola I had to arrange for a third violin, because we only have one viola-player, but much more violinists.
It was a great pleasure to study and to conduct this music. Though to study it sometimes was also quite hard work. But if the end-result is a great success, it was to be worth the work. The pupils like to play this music and it´s quite popular. At the end we had a great applause.
With my little wind-ensemble (2 trumpets, 2 clarinets, 1 trombone, 1 bassoon) I have performed three arrangements: Mazeltov (a folk song), a valse by Poulenc, which is original for piano and the "dance of sabre" (Säbeltanz) by Aram Chatchaturjan.
And I have accompanied a little musical for children on the piano, which my colleague has studied with her lower grade choir. This was also a great fun.

After our concert I have partied with my pupils until mid-night. At the morning I had to stand up at 6 o´clock. But who needs to sleep, if he is happy with some really good and nice pupils. :wink:

In our next Christmas-concert we will study an arrangement of Schuberts symphony nr. 8 (b-minor, The Unfinished, first and second movement). We have made it quite to a tradition, that in summer we play some film-music and in winter a classical orchestra-work.

Thank you for the information about chapter 8. I´m sorry, but I will be able to continue to read only tomorrow, because this evening I still have something to prepare for my german lesson tomorrow. But I´m very curious to read further and can´t wait for it.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 26, 2009 1:55 am 
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I'm glad your concert was a success, Andreas!

Regarding the lack of a tuba in your group – my family and I every year play Christmas songs together with our instruments. My brother used to play the tuba part on his bass trombone, but he is no longer living so now my niece plays the tuba part on an electric keyboard. It sounds good because it helps to have that low bass to ground the music.

musicusblau wrote:
With my little wind-ensemble (2 trumpets, 2 clarinets, 1 trombone, 1 bassoon) I have performed three arrangements: Mazeltov (a folk song), a valse by Poulenc, which is original for piano and the "dance of sabre" (Säbeltanz) by Aram Chatchaturjan.


I know that piece, Sabre Dance. I don’t know if you remember this, but we once had a member who submitted a recording of it. His name was Setrak and he was a real jerk. He one time reprimanded me because I told him his music sounded like it was too good to be true. Turns out that it was – he faked it and all the other pieces he tried to pull off as his own. Robert and Chris got rid of him right away.


musicusblau wrote:
At the morning I had to stand up at 6 o´clock


That’s a funny way of saying that, but it’s pretty much exactly what one has to do after they have awakened.


musicusblau wrote:
In our next Christmas-concert we will study an arrangement of Schuberts symphony nr. 8 (b-minor, The Unfinished, first and second movement).


A couple years ago I read a novel that was about a young woman who was not a very good pianist but suddenly became a great pianist when the ghost of Schubert took over her body. In the end, the ghost showed the woman where he had hidden his ‘Unfinished Symphony’.



musicusblau wrote:
Thank you for the information about chapter 8. I´m sorry, but I will be able to continue to read only tomorrow


No rush, Andreas – we have all the time in the world.

Hopefully!!

Now I just thought of John again and feel really sad. He was a nice friend, but you are too. You talk with me, help me, answer my questions, give me advice, joke with me, send me things….I really appreciate you and I’m glad you have come into my life – even if it is only through our computers, which is fine because I wouldn’t have met you or John otherwise. Friends mean a lot to me, because I don’t make friends that easily. Sorry – I’m getting mushy – can’t stop thinking about John. But I’m sure glad to have our little reading project to help occupy my mind. I don’t practice well when I’m sad - can’t see the music with tears in my eyes. Ohhhhh sorry, again – more mush. I’ll try to be in a better mood tomorrow.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 27, 2009 11:56 pm 
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Quote:
I'm glad your concert was a success, Andreas!

Thanks, Monica! :)

Quote:
Regarding the lack of a tuba in your group – my family and I every year play Christmas songs together with our instruments. My brother used to play the tuba part on his bass trombone, but he is no longer living so now my niece plays the tuba part on an electric keyboard. It sounds good because it helps to have that low bass to ground the music.


I do also replace the tuba and the horn with a stage-piano. Of course, this sounds not as well as real instruments do, but it´s better than to have not these instruments.

Quote:
I know that piece, Sabre Dance. I don’t know if you remember this, but we once had a member who submitted a recording of it. His name was Setrak and he was a real jerk. He one time reprimanded me because I told him his music sounded like it was too good to be true. Turns out that it was – he faked it and all the other pieces he tried to pull off as his own. Robert and Chris got rid of him right away.


No, I don´t remember, but I have experienced, that there are jerks on the world not a long time ago, as you know (I´m talking of the nasty comments on youtube I have received recently.)


Quote:
That’s a funny way of saying that, but it’s pretty much exactly what one has to do after they have awakened.


Sorry for my word-by-word-translation, MOnica. I think, this was a too similar translation to the german expression "aufstehen" (=stand up). In german you say: Ich stehe um 6 Uhr morgens auf. (=I do stand up at 6 o´clock in the morning, if you translate it word by word.) The right way to express it in English is: I do get up at 6 o´clock in the morning, isn´t it?

Quote:
A couple years ago I read a novel that was about a young woman who was not a very good pianist but suddenly became a great pianist when the ghost of Schubert took over her body. In the end, the ghost showed the woman where he had hidden his ‘Unfinished Symphony’.


Very interesting, may be that could be our next book club reading? What is the title of this book?


Quote:
Now I just thought of John again and feel really sad. He was a nice friend, but you are too. You talk with me, help me, answer my questions, give me advice, joke with me, send me things….I really appreciate you and I’m glad you have come into my life – even if it is only through our computers, which is fine because I wouldn’t have met you or John otherwise. Friends mean a lot to me, because I don’t make friends that easily. Sorry – I’m getting mushy – can’t stop thinking about John. But I’m sure glad to have our little reading project to help occupy my mind. I don’t practice well when I’m sad - can’t see the music with tears in my eyes. Ohhhhh sorry, again – more mush. I’ll try to be in a better mood tomorrow.


I have answered you in a privat e-mail to this.

And I have read chapter 8. Yes, it´s interesting, that Sam does find some wrapped hands. Humphreys behaviour becomes stranger and stranger, isn´t it? But all chapter 8 doesn´t bring too much new information. So, I´m curious on chapter 9 now, which I´ll read tomorrow, I think.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 29, 2009 4:12 am 
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I read chapter 9 last night, but I've forgotten what I read and so I have to read it again. I'll comment on it tomorrow.

I am still shocked at what you said about Bohumir Stehlik and his comments on Youtube! I don't think I will ever again speak with him or put up his recordings on PS. One of the other admins will have to do it.

Also - I get up at 6:00 in the morning, but more often 5:30 in the summertime. Something about that the sun shines in my window earlier and so I just wake up. It doesn't matter what time I go to sleep, I still wake up at the same time.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 29, 2009 1:50 pm 
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Ok, wow - a lot happened in chapter 9. Andreas, I don't want to spoil it if you haven't read it yet. I'll just say that Sam is in big trouble, but so is Humphrey.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 29, 2009 4:02 pm 
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I am still shocked at what you said about Bohumir Stehlik and his comments on Youtube! I don't think I will ever again speak with him or put up his recordings on PS. One of the other admins will have to do it.


Thank you, that you stick by me, though I have to add, that Bohumir Stehlik wrote "only" one longer insulting and only negative critique to my 2nd version of Scherzo no. 3, not several (just because you wrote the plural "comments"). In this one nasty comment he didn´t write one positive word, but only how unmusical and how bad it is, how blocked I am and how many technical problems I have, the other 10 nasty comments came from another user named homerboy488 (http://www.youtube.com/user/homerboy488). And these contained a lot of cuss words like "you are an asshole" or "a jerk" and much more of this "nice stuff". Is this homerboy eventually a friend of Bohumir Stehlik? I don´t know and I absolutely don´t know, who this homerboy488 is, I never have had anything to do with him, and I don´t know his real name. For me this whole story is as mysterious as our novel is at this moment.
I really also don´t know, what reason Bohumir Stehlik could have to attac me like this. Wether I know him nor have I wrote one word to one of his recordings. I found it to be very coward of Bohumir Stehlik to write such a negative comment on youtube, it would have been much braver, if he would have written it on PS in my thread. But I suppose, he knows, how obnoxious he would make himself with such a comment here. However, my Scherzo isn´t so bad, that it doesn´t deserve any positive word. (And even if it would be, such a comment would be also very unpolite and unadequate, because we all here play just for pleasure and for free and we invest a lot of time [and money for the recording-equipment] for preparing our recordings. So, if I absolutely don´t like the interpretation of someone, and in my case it could be only mainly the interpretation, what could have disturbed him, because I care very much for the text of the score, one should keep his mouth, nobody is forced to listen to someone, whos interpretation he absolutely doesn´t like) You know, I´m a friend of critical advices and factual critics, which are based on the score. But nasty comments I just delete on youtube and I do block the user, who writes them (one has this option on youtube). I find it to be too silly to start a "battle of cuss words" there or anywhere else.
I personally consider Bohumir Stehlik as someone, who isn´t a member of this site, because a member of this nice site shouldn´t behave so nastily. I have nothing more to say to him.

Quote:
Also - I get up at 6:00 in the morning, but more often 5:30 in the summertime. Something about that the sun shines in my window earlier and so I just wake up. It doesn't matter what time I go to sleep, I still wake up at the same time.


Wow, that´s really very early. I usually do sleep until 8 or 9 in the morning at the weekend, if noone wakes me up.

This evening I´ll read chapter 9. I´m curious.

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Last edited by musicusblau on Mon Jun 29, 2009 9:52 pm, edited 6 times in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 29, 2009 9:39 pm 
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I have read chapter 9. This was very captivating. Sam reveals the secret to Humphrey in a mood of concern and anger. Humphrey runs out of the room, because he feels deeply hurted and destroyed, of course. Bridget is very angry about Sam and wants to punish him severly. She closes up the door of the hotel room from outside, so that Sam is imprisoned in it. This for Sam still is a big punishment, because he wants to help his half-brother, but he can´t. He is in a big struggle of feelings. He discovers to love Humphrey and he is desperated enormously, because he can´t help him.
I think, it´s important somehow, that the hands in the bundle are no real hands, but seem to be cut off from an old doll. But nevertheless the situation is strange, because there seems to be someone else apart from the family, who knows about the details of Magyars life.
The plot still remains mysterious at this point. I don´t know the solution, that´s what makes it so captivating, isn´t it?

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2009 12:59 pm 
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Yes, those fake hands was a surprise! I have no idea who could have put them there. Except maybe that old man, wherever he is. I can't wait to see what happens in chapter 10, so I'm going to read it right now before I go off on my run.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2009 10:39 pm 
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Tomorrow I will have some conferences at school with longer times to wait between. (We are preparing the school reports, because the year ends on 10.7.09 here. Then the summer-holidays will begin. I´ll try to read further while I´m waiting for the next conference. So, it will not be bored. :wink:

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 01, 2009 1:05 pm 
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Chapter 10 was only three pages long, so I also read chapter 11.

Andreas - stop reading this right now if you don't want me to spoil the plot for you.






Chapter 10 - So Sam is locked in the room, but gets someone from the hotel to come up and unlock the door. Big surprise when it turns out to the old man!

Chapter 11 - Well, I'll be! - the old man is not Magyar's ghost like I thought. And Sam sort of thought that as well. The man is actually Magyar's son! And he has taken Humphrey to his home. So now Sam is at the man's home and sees for himself that Humphrey is alive, but because he was drugged, he has been sleeping. One thing puzzles me and that is why Sam keeps smelling that medicinal smell on the old man. We don't have much more to read, so we will probably keep getting more answers on the next chapters.

Can't wait to see what Humphrey is going to say about Sam's revelation, but I won't post anything further until you've read chapters 10 and 11.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 01, 2009 10:00 pm 
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Hi Monica,
today I had a long day of conferences at school, just on my birthday. But the advantage was, because of the long periods I had to wait between the conferences of the different classes I teach, I found many time to read, so I have read chapter 10 and 11, too.
Yes, the old man is a son of Magyar and he is the author of the book. (You remember, I have thought of this possibility, that he could be the author and a descendant of Magyar. 8)
Indeed, the medicinal smell is strange and it Sam combines correctly, if he says, that the old man must have been in Venice and in the compartment of the train. The scene in the dark room on the way to Humphrey was very creepy, isn´t it. Sam expected at every second to get a knife into his stomach or somewhere else. So, in my opinion the author, William Sleator, has a great talent, to cause tenseness. It´s so captivating to read this novel, though I have to admit, that it takes me always much time to look for new vocabularies. Sometimes I´m sitting more than an hour with the LEO-online-dicitionary looking for new words. While reading, I usually do underline all vocabels, which are new for me. If I find the time, I look for all of them, if I have not so much time, I look only for the most important, which I need to understand the essential of the plot. Today I had no more time for the vocabels, but I think, I have understood all the essentials of the plot nevertheless.
I found the Humphreys question strange, as he awakes, if Sam would serve towels with his showers. I couldn´t translate this question in a manner, I would understand. To serve means like to give something or similar. A waiter f. ex. serves a Coke. So, how can Sam serve a towel "with" his showers (german: "er serviert ein Handtuch mit seiner Dusche" does really not make sense tome)? Or is this a saying or an idiomatic expression?

O.k., tomorrow, I think, I shall go to chapter 12.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2009 12:33 am 
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First of all -

Image



I hope you had a nice day today, Andreas.


And now back to the book - that last thing that Humphrey said to Sam. I think Humphrey was making a little joke because although it doesn't say in the words, Sam was very emotional and perhaps tears were coming out of his eyes - like a shower. I could be wrong, but that's what I think.

I'll get to chapter 12 tomorrow too!

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2009 10:02 pm 
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Image

Thank you so much for your nice happy-birthday-wishes!

Image


Quote:
And now back to the book - that last thing that Humphrey said to Sam. I think Humphrey was making a little joke because although it doesn't say in the words, Sam was very emotional and perhaps tears were coming out of his eyes - like a shower. I could be wrong, but that's what I think.


Yes, that´s a good idea, I agree. So, Humphreys sentence gets sense. The other possibility would be, that the author lets Humphrey talk some nonsense, because he still is influenced by the pill, Bridget has given to him.

I have read chapter 12, but I don´t want to spoil you the reading. So, I do it like you did last time and I write my comment all below. So, read it first, please, if you still have read chapter 12.

















In his relief and joy, that Sam has regained his brother Humphrey, he tells that he loves him and he tells the whole secret about the plan of doping Humphrey and writing the music himself and bringing it out as Magyars compositions to save Humphreys career. So, the old man knows it from here on. The old man shows Sam a large cylindrical glass jar, which stands on an old piano, in which are two real hands in formaldehyde. It´s a creepy moment, when Sam describes the hands and says, that they look like the hands of Humphrey. These hands were supposed to be lost like it was said in the book about Magyar the old man has written. Now the old man claims, that he just had invented, that they were lost. The head of Magyar is not in the possession of the old man, but a sister of him has it.
At last the old man shows Sam an ancient leather satchel, which contains old music of Magyar and at the end there comes the clou: the compositions of Magyar, which Sam found inside are absolutely the same as Sam has written and even the wrong notes, Luc had dictated to Sam, are in there.
Now it becomes really really creepy, because at this point there is no more other possibility than the ghost of Magyar has taken possession of Sam from the afterlife. Do you agree?

I have had an idea today:
if we decide in the next time, what we´ll read as next book, I could order it soon and we wouldn´t have such a long time to wait, until I get it (if it´s again a novel, which is only selled overseas).
Do you have any idea respective suggestion, what could be our next novel?

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 03, 2009 2:13 pm 
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Ok, I finished chapter 12 just now.

Wow - creepy is right!!!! I didn't expect that to happen. So there must some kind of ghostly presence somewhere, and in both boys too since Sam wrote out the same music as what was on those old papers, and Humphrey has the same shape hands as Magyar. And also Humphrey plays that music much better than he does the other repertoire.

Chapter 13 is another very short chapter. I'm going to read it as soon as I'm done here on the computer.

As to what book we could read next - I am not sure, but I will think about it. I'd still like to stay with something related to piano and also not a very long book. Maybe Nathan will be back by then. I think he is currently WC (without computer).

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 03, 2009 4:29 pm 
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Pianolady wrote:
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Chapter 13 is another very short chapter. I'm going to read it as soon as I'm done here on the computer.


I´ll also try to read chapter 13 this evening. But first, I have to go to my training. I´m going to a fitness-studio twice in the week, only since 8 weeks now. I want to train before I do wind-surfing in summer at the Ijsselmeer in the Netherlands. Last year I did it unprepared and it was quite a shock to see, how few condition I have had.

Quote:
As to what book we could read next - I am not sure, but I will think about it. I'd still like to stay with something related to piano and also not a very long book. Maybe Nathan will be back by then. I think he is currently WC (without computer).


Yes, in every case it should be piano related. WC is really funny, because it reminds my of the place where we wash our hands! :lol:

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 03, 2009 6:16 pm 
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musicusblau wrote:
I´ll also try to read chapter 13 this evening. But first, I have to go to my training. I´m going to a fitness-studio twice in the week, only since 8 weeks now. I want to train before I do wind-surfing in summer at the Ijsselmeer in the Netherlands. Last year I did it unprepared and it was quite a shock to see, how few condition I have had.


I just came back from my run. I try to run/jog/walk every day, but really I don't like doing it. Takes so long and I could be practicing piano instead. But I do like to eat a lot, so I have to exercise.

musicusblau wrote:
WC is really funny, because it reminds my of the place where we wash our hands!

hmmmm.....WC.....are you talking about a Water Closet? You do more than wash hands in one of those. :lol: :oops: :lol:


I'll write comments on Chapter 13 after I eat my lunch - probably some spaghetti.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 03, 2009 7:36 pm 
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Chapter 13 summary. A very short one!

So Sam sees that all the music he thought he himself composed, was already written down by Magyar a long, long time ago. But the old man did not know about Humphrey saying something about the hands, so both the old man and Sam seem to be puzzled. But we learn no more than that, because Sam's parents have just arrived and have forced themselves into the old man's home.

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 04, 2009 10:37 pm 
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Pianolady wrote:
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hmmmm.....WC.....are you talking about a Water Closet? You do more than wash hands in one of those. :lol: :oops: :lol:


Yes, I was talking about a Water Closet. In Germany we say "I go to wash my hands now" if we want advise someone of our motion to the toilet in a polite and decent manner. :lol: (So, I have made only a joke above.)


Quote:
probably some spaghetti.


Oh, I know you swear on Italian Cooking.

I have read chapter 13 and 14, so I do recapitulate chapter 14 below (again deep below, for that you can decide, if you still want to read it, in the case that you haven´t read chapter 14).








Yes, it´s really strange, that Humphrey knew about the hands, though the old man has invented that story and only has planed to scare the family. So, there must be something like a ghost, who has "whispered" it into Humphreys mind. But only the old man has known of his plan to put the two hands of dolls into the room of the hotel. So, I suppose, that the old man himself has probably a telepathic influence on Humphrey. Wouldn´t this be a possibility? Or it´s the ghost of the dead Magyar, who influences Humphreys mind. What do you think?
O.k., in chapter 14 Bridget and Luc are in the abode of the old man and they want Humphrey to take with them. First Bridget ignores the old man, who wants to show her the old music of Magyar, which is exact the same as Sam wrote. She even doesn´t look at him first, until the old man says, that the music Sam has written is no fake but real. Now Bridget becomes very interested and suddenly she pays attention to the old man. Sam warns the old man, that Bridget will destroy the old music by Magyar, if she gets them into her hands, because it´s the only proof of the fake, which Humphreys family did. The people wouldn´t think, that really a ghost has made influence of Humphrey, but that he has transcribed his music from the old music of Maygar. At least that seems to be Sams opinion, when he says "Not even the most fervent spiritualist would believe that we hadn´t worked together and plotted the whole thing out, that we hadn´t merely copied the originals. The irony was magnificent: The only real evidence of the music´s supernatural origin was at the same time the one tangible document that would show Humphrey to be a fake."
So, Sam wants to prevent Bridget and Luc to go with the old man, who wants to show them the old Magyar music. (By the way, the old man says, that he is Laszlo Magyar. I find that to be strange, because the son would have exact the same name as his father, but in former times this was quite usual, isn´t i? What do you think?)
Sam wants to get the old man away from the door by force, and so at the end of the chapter he is knocked out by Humphreys "malformed fist", which he swung towards the side of Sams head.

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Yes, I was a little taken aback when the old man said his name was Laszlo Magyar. But then I too realized that this was common to name the son the same as the father. Still, maybe we will be surprised again in the next chapter.

Also, I think Sam does not fully understand the importance of his part in all this. ( At least he has not had time to take it all in because of all the commotion going on with Bridget and Luc entering the home. ) Not only was Humphrey ‘inhabited’ by a magical talent/ghost when he played the ‘fake’ music, but Sam was too, since he ‘composed’ the music. So far, none of the others – Humphrey, Luc, and Bridget understand the importance of that. Of course, the old man does – whoever he is. I can’t wait to see how Bridget/Luc/Humphrey re-act when they see the original manuscripts.

And Andreas – we have only about 12 more pages in the book!

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PIanolady wrote:
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And Andreas – we have only about 12 more pages in the book!


Yes, I shall try to finish the book this evening.

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Hi Monica,
I have finished our novel.
In chapter 15 Sam awakes and Luc and Bridget do burn the old music. Sam, Humphrey and the old man flee with the cab, which still was there, because the driver has fallen into sleep meanwhile.
During the drive in the cab, the old man says, that Bridget and Luc were burning only copies of the music and that he still has the original at a safe place.
This is the island, Humphrey has dreamed of quite at the beginning of the novel. Here we are in "reality" (of course, in the fictional reality) in chapter 16, the last one. So, here the frame is completed. On the lonesome island, which is only known by the old man and some local boatsmen, there is the old retirement home of the old Magyar of the nineteenth century. Still the stolen Bösendorfer grand-piano is to be said in a good condition. There Laszlo (the son) has preserved the originals of the last seven compositions of Magyar, which he had left to his son. He is not said to have been a good father, who was interested in his children, but at least he has left his house in Vienna, his retirement home on the island and the royalties of his music to his son, so that he has enough money to live. Now the three live together like a family there and all seems to become better. Bridget and Luc are made responsible for their plan to do the fake. The old man teaches Humphrey, who becomes much better on the piano, and who begins to read books. So, Sam doesn´t feel him to be as stupid as before. And he himself is able to love his brother now, he has not to be so jealous all the time. So, all these things become better, because the pressure of giving concerts is away now.
But the end is creepy nevertheless, because Sam again begins to think of the odd things, which happened to him and Humphrey. First, he thought of telepathy, but at the end he comes to the conclusion, that they both, he and Humphrey, must be reincarnations of the old Magyar, because he died in such a bizarre manner. His head and his hands were separated, so Sam thinks, that he corresponds to Magyars head and Humphrey to his hands. This fits, because it´s said, that Humphreys hands are shaped like Magyars. And Humphrey does all play easily and musically, what Sam writes, also on the island it is still like this. One night they awake both at the same time from a nightmare. They are said to be spoken while sleeping. In Hungarian as Laszlo told them.
So, I think at the end it´s evident, that Magyars ghost has taken influence on Sams and Humphreys mind or that they are really both reincarnations of him. It can not clearly be said, which of both solutions is the right, may be both together.

All in all this was an intriguing and captivating story. The author, William Sleator, is a pianist and writer. I have read the information about him at the end of the book. So, couldn´t it be, that also other novels of him are piano related? In two weeks I go on holidays and I would like to take with me another English novel. Would you like to read a further one, too, Monica? Please, be honest, if you think not to have enough time for it!

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Yay – we have finished our 2nd book!

I was glad to learn that the manuscripts Bridget and Luc were burning were only copies! And for a moment, I thought the whole house was going to catch fire.

I did not suspect that the two brothers would end of living away from their parents. But they were terrible parents after all! And I was glad that Humphrey and Sam really love each other now and are happy living with Laszlo, Jr.

But I loved the ending!!! Yes, I too think that the ghost of Magyar is still around and haunting these two boys. Don’t you wish there was a book 2? And Andreas – I don’t have that information about the author in the back of my book. Interesting that Sleator is also a pianist – maybe he has written other ‘piano’ books. I’ll do a little research.

And also, sure – I will read another book with you. But the hard part will be picking one out. And the next hard thing will be whether you can get your hands on a copy before you leave on your vacation.

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Yes, it would be nice, if there would exist a second volume of "Fingers".
O.k., I shall also look around a bit on the internet for other books of Sleator. Of course, it would be nice, if we find a next book to read and if I get it before my holidays. In the case, that there would be not enough time to order it for me, we´ll continue, when I´m back. The world wouldn´t go under from it. :wink:

I thank you very much for being my reading-partner here. Image You are really wonderful and I´m motivated to read very much by our PS book club. What a pity, that Nathan was WC all the time, though he had not to wash his hands. :lol: I was missing him here.

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musicusblau wrote:
What a pity, that Nathan was WC all the time, though he had not to wash his hands. :lol: I was missing him here.


Me too. Would also be nice if other members participate.

I'll look around on the Internet too. May not be until tomorrow, though - my husband is home (you remember what that means... :wink: ) (shhhh..don't tell here)



Edit - Oh shoot - you just put up a cute smiley. You're too fast for me!! :lol:

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Pianolady wrote:
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(shhhh..don't tell here)


You can be sure, that I shall not tell it here! :wink: :lol:

Quote:
Edit - Oh shoot - you just put up a cute smiley. You're too fast for me!! :lol:


As a real german cowboy I´m hauling my weapons faster than you! :lol:

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Hi Monica,
I have looked for recapitulations of the novels of William Sleator and I have found some here:
http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/s/william-sleator/
But it seems, that no other of his novels has something to do with piano or even music. So, we would have to look for another author. But I have to admit, that I`m quite helpless in this point, because I don´t know the American and English literature of today. :oops:
I would be glad, if you or Nathan could find a nice and piano related new novel for us.

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Ok, Hi again, Andreas. I have had no time today to look for books but I will do so very soon. I know there are many books relating to music, so I know we will find one.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 10, 2009 3:46 am 
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Hi Andreas,

I think I have found a book possibility. Here is the information: The title is just plain, "Piano".


Piano : a novel / Jean Echenoz ; translated from the French by Mark Polizzotti.

Max Delmarc, age 50, is a famous concert pianist with two problems: the first is a paralyzing stage fright for which the second, alcohol, is the only treatment. In this unparalleled comedy from the Prix Concourt-winning French novelist Jean Echenoz, we journey with Max, from the trials of his everyday life, through his untimely death, and on into the afterlife.

After a brief stay in purgatory—part luxury hotel, part minimum security prison, under the supervision of deceased celebrities—Max is cast into an alarmingly familiar partition of hell, "the urban zone," a dark and cloudy city much like his native Paris on an eternally bad day. Unable to play his beloved piano or stomach his needed drink, Max engages in a hapless struggle to piece his former life back together while searching in vain for the woman he once loved.

An acclaimed bestseller with 50,000 copies sold in France, Piano is a sly, sardonic evocation of Dante and Sartre for the present day, the playful, daring masterpiece of a novelist at the top of his form.

Author Biography: Jean Echenoz won France's prestigious Prix Goncourt for I'm Gone. He is the author of four previous novels in English translation, including Big Blondes and Cherokee, winner of the Prix Medicis. He lives in Paris. Translator Mark Polizzotti is publications director at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Formerly the editorial director of David R. Godine, Publisher, he has translated works by André Breton, Patrick Chamoiseau, and Marguerite Duras.

*******************************************

Sounds a bit different, doesn't it? But I like books with unusual and quirky plots and settings. And Andreas - this book is also in French, and I know French is easier for you than English and so maybe you'd like to read it in French and I will read it in English? But I also know you are trying to improve your English so then of course you would want the English version like what I will read.

Anyway, does this interest you? It's okay if it does not. I can keep looking.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 10, 2009 11:14 pm 
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Hi Monica,
thank you for your research. I also would like to read this book. It´s interesting, I have found an English version and a German version, but not one in French.
I have ordered both, the English and the German book and I´ll read both. I think, it will be very interesting and instructional to compare the English translation with the German one. That´s a very nice reading for my holidays, I think. (My other one will be a book about "Maria Stuart - might and passion" by Reay Tannahill, I don´t know, if the title is original, it´s a word-by-word-translation of the German title "Macht und Leidenschaft", but the author is an English-man. I have to teach "Maria Stuart" by Friedrich Schiller in the next school-year and I wanted to increase my background-knowledge by a historic biography.)

I found the following English recapitulation:
Max Delmarc, age 50, is a famous concert pianist with two problems: the first is a paralyzing stage fright for which the second, alcohol, is the only treatment. In this unparalleled comedy from the Prix Concourt-winning French novelist Jean Echenoz, we journey with Max, from the trials of his everyday life, through his untimely death, and on into the afterlife. After a brief stay in purgatory - part luxury hotel, part minimum security prison, under the supervision of deceased celebrities - Max is cast into an alarmingly familiar partition of hell, "the urban zone," a dark and cloudy city much like his native Paris on an eternally bad day. Unable to play his beloved piano or stomach his needed drink, Max engages in a hapless struggle to piece his former life back together while searching in vain for the woman he once loved. An acclaimed bestseller with 50,000 copies sold in France, Piano is a sly, sardonic evocation of Dante and Sartre for the present day, the playful, daring masterpiece of a novelist at the top of his form.

And one in German (just for the case, you like to compare the English recapitulation with the German one):

"Max Delmarc, der erfolgreiche 50-jährige Pianist, hat noch 22 Tage zu leben. Aber für jeden großen Künstler gibt es ein Leben nach dem Tod, und war das Leben von Max nicht eher die Hölle? Die tägliche Angst vor dem gefräßigen Rachen des Pianos war ohnehin nur im Alkohol zu ertränken, und auf die Bühne musste er förmlich gestoßen werden, bevor er sein Publikum verzauberte. Ein Leben, ganz der Kunst gewidmet, ist wie eine Schattenexistenz, in der Frauen, beispielsweise, nur als Phantome auftreten ... Nach einem nächtlichen Überfall landet Max im Purgatorium, das einem großstädtischen Krankenhaus zum Verwechseln ähnelt, und das Urteil wird gesprochen: Entlassung in ein neues Leben in einer paradiesischen Parklandschaft oder - wie für Max - in der "städtischen Zone", die Paris sein könnte und die wir Lebenden auch Hölle nennen ..."

O.k., I think, that´s an interesting choice and I have ordered the book in English and in German.

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Ok, great. I will put up a new thread about book number 3 shortly.

And Andreas, approximately when do you expect to receive your books? Also, are you taking a laptop computer with you when you go on vacation?

btw - I've read and seen a lot of movies about Mary Stuart's cousin, Queen Elizabeth, but I don't know so much about Mary herself. I like learning about those times, so maybe one day we can find a book that deals with both keyboard music (harpsichord?) and the life of royals or any old body in the fifteen or sixteen hundreds. Or 1700 or 1800 for that matter. I love all that historical stuff.

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And Andreas, approximately when do you expect to receive your books? Also, are you taking a laptop computer with you when you go on vacation?


That´s the problem. The German book I will have within 3 or 4 days, the English version has a delivery time of 2 - 4 weeks, like our novel "Fingers" had had for me. So, I fear we can´t read it commonly in the time of my vacations. I have no laptop-computer, but I´ll write you a pm concerning this matter.

Quote:
btw - I've read and seen a lot of movies about Mary Stuart's cousin, Queen Elizabeth, but I don't know so much about Mary herself. I like learning about those times, so maybe one day we can find a book that deals with both keyboard music (harpsichord?) and the life of royals or any old body in the fifteen or sixteen hundreds. Or 1700 or 1800 for that matter. I love all that historical stuff.


Yes, would be interesting to find such a novel. Friedrich der Große was a great flute-player, but I don´t know any king or monarch of the 15th-18th century, who was also a good piano- respective harpsichord-player. Do you know one?

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musicusblau wrote:

Yes, would be interesting to find such a novel. Friedrich der Große was a great flute-player, but I don´t know any king or monarch of the 15th-18th century, who was also a good piano- respective harpsichord-player. Do you know one?


No, I don't. But it might make a nice little research project so I will look into sometime.

And I have something personal to say too so I'm going over to the pm's now.

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Ok, it's three hours later and I had some time to look into our next next book. All I'm doing today is baking cakes and smoking my butt for my son's birthday party tomorrow. I have a lot of waiting around time right now.

I did not find much in the way of 15th or 16th century historical novels involving keyboard music. There are some novels about Mozart, 1. Marrying Mozart - I read that one a long time ago, but would not mind reading it again. 2. Mozart's Sister - about Nanerl.

I'll keep looking....

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Hi Monica,
first, could you send me a piece of the birthday-cake? :P :wink: (Hoo, "to smoke my butt", I don´t dare to translate that into good German. :shock: :lol: )

Yes, I think, nearly every biography of composers of the 15th to 18th century would be possible to read, too, and I think, this would be very interesting, but I thought, you would like to combine the story of a person of nobility and something piano respective music related. That´s not so easy, I think. Mozart f.ex. was not a person of nobility.

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musicusblau wrote:
first, could you send me a piece of the birthday-cake? :P :wink: (Hoo, "to smoke my butt", I don´t dare to translate that into good German. :shock: :lol: )


:lol: :lol: It's not my butt I am smoking. It's a pig's. :lol: :lol:

I should have worded that differently. I was talking about a pork roast. I put a large pork butt (roast) in the smoker and cook it for about 10 hours. The meat becomes so tender that you can pull it apart with a fork. We call it "pulled pork". I am making barbecued pulled-pork sandwiches for the party tomorrow. I know you won't eat it, so I will send you just the cake (chocolate). :wink:

And yes - I would be interested in reading biographies of composers. But I also really like historical novels. Well, we can just wait until after our current book read before we have to pick out another one.

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Quote:
I should have worded that differently. I was talking about a pork roast. I put a large pork butt (roast) in the smoker and cook it for about 10 hours. The meat becomes so tender that you can pull it apart with a fork. We call it "pulled pork". I am making barbecued pulled-pork sandwiches for the party tomorrow. I know you won't eat it, so I will send you just the cake (chocolate). :wink:


Oh, sorry, first I thought you wanted to say something vulgar like "I´m working my butt off". :oops: But surely you wouldn´t say things like that, right?! :)
"To smoke" I knew only in expressions like "to smoke a cigarette" or something like that. So, this was really a missunderstanding because of my imperfect English.

Quote:
And yes - I would be interested in reading biographies of composers. But I also really like historical novels. Well, we can just wait until after our current book read before we have to pick out another one.


I agree. First let us read "Piano", then we could have a look for a nice historical novel or a composer-biography.

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