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PostPosted: Tue May 05, 2009 9:22 pm 
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O.k., Monica, today I also had no time to read. So I´ll read chapter 23 the next days or at the weekend perhaps. I´m very comprehensive, if you have no time to read as good mates should be for each other. ImageSo, we have all time in the world. :)

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PostPosted: Thu May 07, 2009 12:41 pm 
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Ok, just read chapter 22. Boy, do I ever want to try playing a Fazioli! They sound so amazing. There is a Fazioli dealer in the same building in Chicago where the Chicago Symphony Orchestra plays, but I have never been in it. I'm usually there on late Sunday afternoons, and I'm not sure the dealer is open at that time. But if one of you PS friends ever came to Chicago, I would definitely go there with you.

In our book, I found it funny that Paulo Fazioli picked up Thad from the train station, instead of a regular taxi cab. Thad is very lucky to have gotten to see the Fazioli factory. I did know that piano soundboards are made from Spruce wood. Steinways use a particular tree called a Sitka Spruce. I wonder if Red Spruces are that much better than Sitka spruces. But Paulo Fazioli must have thought that they were since he circled the globe in search of the best wood.

And Nathan, I've never been to a piano factory either, but you can look at video and pictures of the Steinway factory in New York. http://www.steinway.com/factory/


Ok, on to the Chapter 23. We're almost done!

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PostPosted: Thu May 07, 2009 8:45 pm 
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Hi, yippee,
I have finished the book. Let´s have a common drink and celebrate the long and nice period of common reading. Image

To chapter 23 +24: It´s very nice, that Luc finally found a girl-friend, with whom he is happy. I think, Mathilde and Luc fit very well together, because of their common passion to piano and music for piano. It´s so intriguing as the unknown pianist came and played the Scarlatti-sonata in the cold atelier. I really ask me, if this is realistic, because I never could play a fast piece fluently, if it is so cold. What do you think?
Also the story of Mathilde, how she has lost her piano, is fascinating somehow, because it shows, that a piano can be such a personal thing. She feels commited to her piano of youth, because it was the connection between her and her late father. And so the loss of the piano of her childhood in her psychic state got the meaning of a symbol of the loss of her dad.
These two last chapters have an obvious function of a framework. Some motifs and strands of the plot come to a final end here. First the story of Luc and his fate, second the story of Mathilde. As a motif there come together Lucs favored pianos: in chapter 23 we are told of the old Pleyel and the extraordinary matter, that Luc plans to liberate the black lacquering of the cabinet and wants to reproduce the pure wood and the particular sound of this old instrument from the twenties.
In the last chapter Thad recapulates all kinds of Lucs "dream pianos" and at last we see, that this was a very interesting and changeful lineup.
I´m missing the plot of Jos and his development. It´s the only person, who experiences a negative development in the novel, isn´t it?

Phew, I´m very happy, that finally I came through the whole book, which I never would have thought, when I began. I thank you, especially Monica, for the constant participation and exchange of thoughts, which I felt to be very interesting. To have read the book was a pure enrichment (because of its subject and because I could learn and refresh a lot of English, which I should speak and write a bit better now, so I hope at least). Your participation was always inspiring and a motivation to read further. (I´m not sure, if I would have read the whole book alone, without any person, who reads along.)
So, for me it stays to say: Image

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PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 1:18 pm 
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Yay, we did it! So here's my 'cheers' to you both! [img]http://www.smileyshut.com/smileys/new/free-party-smileys-773[1].gif[/img]

Nathan you must be done as well since you read a novel in a day. :)

Here are few of my thoughts on the last two chapters: That Pleyel grand sounded nice. I did not know that pianos could be made of this wood. And don't you wish you could have actually been there to see all these 'special' pianos? I'd like to know what becomes of some of the ones we 'met' in the book - see what their 'life' -so to speak- is like now.

And yes - I'm glad Luc has a girlfriend to share his passion for pianos. And you're right about that old man who came in and played that Scarlatti piece in the cold. I could never do that either, and that was a strange part in the story.

Then there is poor Jos. I guess we will never know what happened to him.

As for the end, when we learn about Mathilde's piano which she lost - my parents still have the grand piano that I played on while I was growing up. It sits in their living room with pretty framed photos of family sitting on the closed top (I don't do that with my own piano). My mom still plays it sometimes and has stacks of music sitting on the sides. However, I don't like to play it because it does not sound good anymore. I have become spoiled in a way since owning my own new grand which I have tuned every three months so it's always in tune and the action works well. But I do like looking at my parents grand and just like knowing that it is still around. I know I will be sad when the day comes that we have to take out the piano. Not sure anyone will even want it, so maybe it will become like what Luc did with some of his old pianos - fire wood. Oh, that makes me cry a little thinking of that. Shoot - now I'm in a sad mood.

Oh well, Andreas - I think it is wonderful that you read the book in a different language. Really! It would take me so long to do that if the book were in German. Thank you also for your thoughtful and interesting comments. But most of all for participating. I liked doing this very much with you and Nathan.

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my videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/monicapiano
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PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 2:29 pm 
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This has been a blast reading with you guys!!!!! and yes, I finished at the doc's office, but didn't want to brag ... it seemed unseemly.

How nice for Luc to have apartner in life and soul. I love the ending ... "NEVER TOO MANY DREAM PIANOS" ... I don[t think a non-pianist can understand truly that statement. I think if every room in mhy house had a piano, I'd still look for more! hehe

speaking of ... don't cry Monica ... I'll take that grand off your hands!! :wink:

I just ordered fingers and a few other bks from amazon .... I'm ready fro next installment!!!!

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"You see, my piano is for me what his ship is to a sailor; more indeed: it is my very self, my mother tongue, my life." - Franz Liszt


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PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 6:40 pm 
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nathanscoleman wrote:

speaking of ... don't cry Monica ... I'll take that grand off your hands!! :wink:


Well, I hope to you know how to practically re-build a piano. It's all in one piece, but the hammers are dead, the strings are old, the pedals are doing some weird things, etc... But you know, I think the keys are ivory - hmmmm- that didn't occur to me until just now. Wonder if it is possible to do a piano transplant - just like an organ transplant, right? haha - get it?

About our next book, Fingers. Ok I am in. I found it at my local library again, but like you already know, it's on Amazon for only about $7.00. Andreas, do you want to do another book club? Nathan, do you think we should start a new topic, just in case other members want to get in? And let me know when you want to get started.

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my videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/monicapiano
my personal website: http://www.monicaalianello.com


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PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 11:08 pm 
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I just ordered fingers ... but it hasn't come in yet. Maybe if we do a book club redux thread???

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"You see, my piano is for me what his ship is to a sailor; more indeed: it is my very self, my mother tongue, my life." - Franz Liszt


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