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 Post subject: Characteristic pieces
PostPosted: Mon Jan 05, 2009 9:08 pm 
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Joined: Mon Sep 18, 2006 7:03 pm
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Location: Pennsylvania, USA
I'm doing a project on the Classical Era, and as part of it, I need to explain the important composers of the time. I have decided to focus upon Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, and Schubert to some degree. However, I need to provide audio examples of their pieces, and I cannot decide which pieces would be most characteristic of these composers. If you could list about 2 pieces for each of the four aforementioned composers that epitomize their style, I would really appreciate it.

Thanks!

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 05, 2009 9:31 pm 
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Location: Obamanation, unfortunately...
Just piano compositions or all styles (i.e. orchestra, trio, quartet organ, harpsichord, etc.)? If the latter, then it will be much easier

(i.e: Mozart = "Eine Kleine Nachtmusik", Haydn = "The Surprise Symphony", Bach = Goldberg Variations, Beethoven = 9th Symphony, Schubert = Mars militaire)

The list will vary greatly from contributor to contributor, but we'll all agree on some compositions :lol: (great minds think alike) :lol: :roll:

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 05, 2009 10:03 pm 
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Oh, I'm sorry I didn't clarify that. I meant any type of piece, not just piano pieces.

Also, while these pieces should be characteristic, it probably wouldn't be good if they were cliche.

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"When one does a thing, it appears good, otherwise one would not write it. Only later comes reflection, and one discards or accepts the thing. Time is the best censor, and patience a most excellent teacher." - Frédéric Chopin


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 6:28 pm 
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Location: Obamanation, unfortunately...
But don't cliches defined by characteristics and observable truths? Being popular doesn't necessarily mean cliche; I provided, perhaps, the most popular compositions for each composer.

What I provided doesn't mean that they are not good; they are all wonderful music and masterfully done.

Let's see what others list as characteristic for each...

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 8:00 pm 
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Joined: Mon Dec 03, 2007 7:27 pm
Posts: 194
I think it would be interesting to pick an early and a late piece from each. That way you could show
how each succeeding composer was influenced by the preceding one. For example, to me
early Mozart sounds a little like Haydn, early Beethoven sounds just like Haydn with a little
Mozart thrown in. I'm not familiar enough with Schubert to make a comparison like this
but there must be something there too. With this in mind I would probably choose going
with all the same type of music: single instrument, quartet or orchestral. I wouldn't mix and match
because your audience will get confused. You could pick an early quartet and a late quartet
from each and make your comparisons. The piano music would be pure and simple to show
the similarities and differences too, just don't pick really complicated ones. Keep your examples
simple otherwise your point will be lost to the listener/reader. I made this mistake when I was
in school in a paper about fugues. I chose my favorite ones to present but they were all
really way too complicated to show the essence of a fugue.

I should say with Mozart you probably don't want to pick a really earlier piece, maybe something
more from his teen years would be better.

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"I am glad that you wish to study the art of tones from its roots up, and it depends only on you to learn for yourself so much of it as has become known to me." -- J.S. Bach


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