Piano Society
Free Classical Keyboard Recordings
It is currently Tue Sep 02, 2014 5:47 am

All times are UTC - 1 hour




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 142 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 10  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2009 11:12 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2006 12:38 pm
Posts: 8480
Well, can you get your money back from the paper book you ordered? If not, then I don't mind waiting for you to get it and then we can start our discussion. I don't know if any of the other members have the book yet, either.

However, since you have a long vacation starting now, I'd order that e-book. It's fine with me either way.

_________________
"Simplicity is the highest goal, achievable when you have overcome all difficulties." ~ Frederic Chopin

my videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/monicapiano
my personal website: http://www.monicaalianello.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2009 11:22 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jan 20, 2008 5:45 pm
Posts: 2815
Location: Germany
O.k., I think on tuesday I´ll order that e-book. So, I can directly use the online-dictionary while reading. That´s the advantage. The disadvantage is, that my computer does not want to go into my bed with me. :wink: :lol: (Though I´m always a bit sceptical to give my credit-card-number in the internet. But I have done this still several times, because there was no other possibility.)

_________________
Link to my videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/musicusblau


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2009 3:01 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jan 20, 2008 5:45 pm
Posts: 2815
Location: Germany
Hi Monica,
I have bought the e-book now, because the book-shop has difficulties to order this book for me. I can read it with Adobe Digital Editions and it´s very comfortable, because I can use the online-dicitionary in the same time. I have started to read chapter one: "Luc".

I have a question: What means the word "bank" in the title exactly. Does it mean "upheavel" or "serie of houses or something else (a money-bank?). I can´t translate it surely somehow.

In every case I´ll improve my English by reading this. So, will you start to read, too?

_________________
Link to my videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/musicusblau


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2009 4:11 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2006 1:03 pm
Posts: 2388
Location: Obamanation, unfortunately...
musicusblau wrote:
I have a question: What means the word "bank" in the title exactly. Does it mean "upheavel" or "series of houses or something else (a money-bank?). I can´t translate it surely somehow.


"Bank" can also mean something like "die Sandbank" or "die Schneeverwehung" or "das Steilufer" or "der Strand" but that is assuming the author is not punning on the word "left bank".

_________________
Madam, what makes you think that I play with my hands?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2009 4:48 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2006 12:38 pm
Posts: 8480
musicusblau wrote:
Hi Monica,
I have bought the e-book now, because the book-shop has difficulties to order this book for me. I can read it with Adobe Digital Editions and it´s very comfortable, because I can use the online-dicitionary in the same time. I have started to read chapter one: "Luc".

I have a question: What means the word "bank" in the title exactly. Does it mean "upheavel" or "serie of houses or something else (a money-bank?). I can´t translate it surely somehow.

In every case I´ll improve my English by reading this. So, will you start to read, too?


It means the left side of the Seine River. In Paris, places are often described as being located on the right side of the river, or the left.

Yes - I have the book also and just started chapter one last night. I think it will be a charming book! I wish other members would read along with us.

_________________
"Simplicity is the highest goal, achievable when you have overcome all difficulties." ~ Frederic Chopin

my videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/monicapiano
my personal website: http://www.monicaalianello.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2009 8:42 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jan 20, 2008 5:45 pm
Posts: 2815
Location: Germany
Thanks, Monica.
Yes, I hope, we´ll not be a two-man-book-club here. :lol:

_________________
Link to my videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/musicusblau


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2009 10:34 am 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Mon Jun 12, 2006 11:45 am
Posts: 9534
Location: Netherlands
musicusblau wrote:
I think, it will be too difficult for me to read the whole book, because there are many many words, which I don´t know. (And I think, I´ll not have the time to look for much words in my dictionary.)

I remember reading my first English book was rather difficult (it was "My Family and other Animals" by Gerald Durrell). I had an uncontrollable urge to consult the dictionary for each word I did not know (and there were a lot, the topic being wildlife). But this is what you must not do - unless not knowing a word makes you lose the line of the story. You'd never get through a book that way. Rather, try to learn by association, as kids do. In many cases, you can guess (part of a) word's meaning from the context. Usually, when a word has appeared a couple of times (and most words do), you get its meaning allright.

This must have worked, as I have been reading English books ever since, and never had any problems since the first. Not to say I never had to look up an unfamiliar word, it happens occasionally.

_________________
Nothing is always absolutely so -- Sturgeon's law
Chris Breemer


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2009 12:27 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2006 12:38 pm
Posts: 8480
I just heard back from Nathan. He is still in but has not the time this week, but will get to it next week. It really doesn't matter how long we take to read the book.

I'm asking people directly to join with us too - maybe we can get a few more readers.

_________________
"Simplicity is the highest goal, achievable when you have overcome all difficulties." ~ Frederic Chopin

my videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/monicapiano
my personal website: http://www.monicaalianello.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2009 12:44 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jan 20, 2008 5:45 pm
Posts: 2815
Location: Germany
Juufa72 wrote:
Quote:
"Bank" can also mean something like "die Sandbank" or "die Schneeverwehung" or "das Steilufer" or "der Strand" but that is assuming the author is not punning on the word "left bank".


Thank you for these advices, Julius :D , but somehow Monicas explanation was more concrete.

_________________
Link to my videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/musicusblau


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2009 12:47 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jan 20, 2008 5:45 pm
Posts: 2815
Location: Germany
Techneut wrote:
Quote:
I remember reading my first English book was rather difficult (it was "My Family and other Animals" by Gerald Durrell). I had an uncontrollable urge to consult the dictionary for each word I did not know (and there were a lot, the topic being wildlife). But this is what you must not do - unless not knowing a word makes you lose the line of the story. You'd never get through a book that way. Rather, try to learn by association, as kids do. In many cases, you can guess (part of a) word's meaning from the context. Usually, when a word has appeared a couple of times (and most words do), you get its meaning allright.

This must have worked, as I have been reading English books ever since, and never had any problems since the first. Not to say I never had to look up an unfamiliar word, it happens occasionally.


Thanks for these tips, Chris. :D I think, you are absolutely right with that. I´m always too detailed (it´s my character somehow :roll: ). It makes much more fun, if I get through the story by understanding the main-action. And I think, may be in the way the chance is bigger, that I come through the whole book.
I´ll continue to read this evening. I´m looking forward to it.

_________________
Link to my videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/musicusblau


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2009 12:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jan 20, 2008 5:45 pm
Posts: 2815
Location: Germany
Pianolady wrote:
Quote:
I'm asking people directly to join with us too - maybe we can get a few more readers.


Fine, the more people read and talk with us the more interesting it will be, I think.

_________________
Link to my videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/musicusblau


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2009 2:14 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2006 1:03 pm
Posts: 2388
Location: Obamanation, unfortunately...
musicusblau wrote:
Juufa72 wrote:
Quote:
"Bank" can also mean something like "die Sandbank" or "die Schneeverwehung" or "das Steilufer" or "der Strand" but that is assuming the author is not punning on the word "left bank".


Thank you for these advices, Julius :D , but somehow Monicas explanation was more concrete.



:x

_________________
Madam, what makes you think that I play with my hands?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2009 5:23 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jan 20, 2008 5:45 pm
Posts: 2815
Location: Germany
Juufa72 wrote:
Quote:
:x


Not mad, just funny. :wink:

_________________
Link to my videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/musicusblau


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2009 9:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jan 20, 2008 5:45 pm
Posts: 2815
Location: Germany
News: I have read the first chapter "Luc". It was very nice and to read works very well, I think. I don´t understand all words and details, but I think, I understand the main-plot.
This book would be interesting for Chris especially, because there is mentioned a Gaveau-baby-grand. :wink:
It´s a very interesting and perspective introduction in the theme of piano-brands and piano-building-traditions and -reputations and what marks a "good" piano, I think.
It´s also a bit mysterious, that the first-person-narrator has to be recommended by another client of this shop. I don´t understand yet why it is like this. But it gives this novel and the whole piano-theme an exclusive atmosphere.
In every case I´m up to read further...

_________________
Link to my videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/musicusblau


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2009 2:18 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2006 12:38 pm
Posts: 8480
I like the way that the store is set up to be a mysterious place, and our main character (have we learned his name yet?) grows more and more curious every day. And when he is finally allowed to enter the ‘back room’, we are as awe-struck as he is when looks upon all the beautiful pianos.

And it is interesting how Luc behaves as he describes certain pianos. Like some of them are personal friends, and others are simply pieces of wood. You can tell that Luc and the other sort of grouchy older man in the shop will allow one of their pianos to be sold only to the right kind of person. I can’t wait to see which one our character actually gets. He originally thought he would purchase an upright piano, but now he has a sudden yearning to go with a grand. Maybe we will find out in chapter 2 which I will start later today.

_________________
"Simplicity is the highest goal, achievable when you have overcome all difficulties." ~ Frederic Chopin

my videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/monicapiano
my personal website: http://www.monicaalianello.com


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 142 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 10  Next

All times are UTC - 1 hour


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group