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 Post subject: Clementi Sonatina Op. 36, No. 5
PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 5:56 pm 
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This one was very hard for me. Please say it is okay, because my wrists hurt and I have no more energy.

(if it is terrible, I will re-do it, but not until after I have played a bunch of slow pieces)

Clementi - Sonatina Op.36 No.5 in G major - 1. Presto
Clementi - Sonatina Op.36 No.5 in G major - 2. Air Suisse
Clementi - Sonatina Op.36 No.5 in G major - 3. Rondo

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 Post subject: Clementi
PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 6:40 pm 
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What a pleasure to listen to your Clementi! You are wrong. It absolutely is NOT terrible. Who cares about a couple of little slips? You did a good job.

Clementi is not easy, but it's a lot of fun to play. You have a very nice touch for Clementi. I particularly liked the way you played the "ornaments" in the second movement.

Keep it up!


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 7:12 pm 
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Monica, can you please indicate the order of the movements ? What is 1, 2, and 3 ? I always need to go and look that up. Can't be bothered really :roll:

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 7:46 pm 
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Presto - 1st movement
Air Suisse - 2nd
Rondo - 3rd

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 8:22 pm 
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Thanks.
Nothing at all wrong with this ! There may be a handful of tiny slips, but it's very convincingly done. The LH triplets in the Presto could be a bit more supple, and there are some signs of strain in the Rondo (I guess this was near the end of your session and you were getting a bit tired). Otherwise, nothing but praise again. Seems like the piano has dropped a little in tune, but nothing unpleasant as yet. Good job, I have just put them up.

Nice to hear the Rondo again - used to play that in lesson as a youth.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 10:23 pm 
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Boy, you are fast today. Thank you.


Quote:
Seems like the piano has dropped a little in tune, but nothing unpleasant as yet.

Does it sound different than just two days ago when I recorded the Contredanse? I don't hear any change, but you hear better than I.

Thanks to you too, John.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 2007 10:41 am 
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This Sonatina is really tricky and requires very good technique. Most of the time, you play it well but there are some passages where I wish for a smoother and more even play. But no need to re-record it of course. Play more scales! :)

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2007 9:33 am 
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pianolady wrote:
Does it sound different than just two days ago when I recorded the Contredanse? I don't hear any change, but you hear better than I

Forgot to answer this one...
Not sure really. In the Contredanse (for which I've fixed the link btw, it's in Miscellaneous) I did not hear any out of tune notes if I remember well. Here, some of the high notes are a bit iffy. But not distractingly so. Don't worry about it !

I also forgot to mention that with this Sonatine we have another Complete Recording up the site - the complete Clementi Op.36 Sonatinas. Great job ! It makes me happy to have complete recordings :D because I believe this makes a difference both for the pianist as well as the site. I think a page with a complete set is far more likely to get referenced elsewhere on the web, especially witjh repertoire which is not recorded so often.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 23, 2007 9:32 am 
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That's quality stuff like usual from you!
Anyhow it seems to me that those Sonatinas fit very well with your playing style - technically very good, precise, clear keytouch. Maybe the trioles in the first movement sounded a tiny bit uneven on places, but you played it pretty fast, and it sounded still really good.

That Clementi seemed not to put in the most imaginable creative energy both harmony and melody wise in that pieces is nothing what you can be accused for. Great that you finished a cycle of Sonatinas (although I don't think that one should feel a need for doing cycles, instead playing what makes fun the most)!

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 23, 2007 10:19 am 
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MindenBlues wrote:
(although I don't think that one should feel a need for doing cycles, instead playing what makes fun the most)!

There is some truth in that. On the other hand, there must be some pianists who are prepared to do more than cherry-pick the nicest bits, or we'll end up with many recordings of popular items and none of the less popular items. I do believe that complete sets give an added value to PS as well as to the pianist and that is why I always go on about it.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 23, 2007 10:34 am 
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techneut wrote:
MindenBlues wrote:
(although I don't think that one should feel a need for doing cycles, instead playing what makes fun the most)!

There is some truth in that. On the other hand, there must be some pianists who are prepared to do more than cherry-pick the nicest bits, or we'll end up with many recordings of popular items and none of the less popular items. I do believe that complete sets give an added value to PS as well as to the pianist and that is why I always go on about it.


I agree that it is good to have also pieces of minor popularity on the site, so this for sure gives added value to PS. Added value to the pianist? Do you mean because of the quantity of pieces? I think more about that if one plays a piece more or less only because it belongs to a cycle, because one feels kind of duty to do so, but not because one feels the inner need to express something special through the piece, it will sound accordingly, and the value of this is accordingly too.

But you definitely have the point that it is good to have a wide spread of pieces, not only the popular ones here on PS. But maybe there is already spread enough because pianist's tastes are differently?

Don't get me wrong - it is a very very great achievement from you to plan complete cycles of Chopin Mazurkas, Bach WTC1&2, KdF, Orgelb├╝chlein and so on and so on. Unbelievable large output!

Sorry for coming off topic, by the way.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 23, 2007 11:12 am 
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I was not referring to quantity for quantity's sake. I just do believe that artists who venture outside the trodden paths, and record the pieces that most others pass by, make a difference - and are appreciated for doing so. They are the worker bees of the musical scene, and things would be far less interesting without them. Or perhaps that is just my opinion.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 23, 2007 11:43 am 
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Well, here's my spin. Originally, I was only going to record one of the sonatinas. Then when talk started about completing sets, I thought that these sonatinas are something I could possibly do, given that they are not that difficult (except for the last one, which almost broke my wrists). So I did the next ones and discovered (actually re-discovered) that they were fun to play and I was getting a lot of good practicing and experience with the recorder, etc... But by the time I got to the last one, I was very tired of sonatinas.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 23, 2007 1:16 pm 
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techneut wrote:
I was not referring to quantity for quantity's sake. I just do believe that artists who venture outside the trodden paths, and record the pieces that most others pass by, make a difference - and are appreciated for doing so. They are the worker bees of the musical scene, and things would be far less interesting without them. Or perhaps that is just my opinion.


I agree completely - beeing open minded and ready for something outside the often used pieces I appreciate much too. Especially (and that is the however) if I sense that the artist searches and find something to say for that outside piece. If it is however a piece in a cycle, what does not say much to the pianist, and accordingly not to the listener, I would rather look for another unused piece (if it should be something like this). The question is, what is the point in playing something solely to close a cycle e.g.? The danger is even greater if it is no big artist who always sounds beautiful even if he/she is forced to play a piece he/she does not like, but it is a sparetime player (like me e.g.). So I for myself would always look for a piece I expect to find anytime access to, let it be a well known or unknown piece.

Can't reply to an eventually discussion anymore - have to leave until Sunday evening.

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