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 Post subject: Re: G. Catoire, Quatre Morceaux, Op. 12, No. 3, "Nocturne"
PostPosted: Sun Jun 20, 2010 6:27 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 25, 2008 1:09 pm
Posts: 367
Location: Athens, Greece
Congratulations on completing the set, David. Your playing is descriptive and meaningful. You have a patience with phrases and details which helps reveal certain aspects of the musical text which in turn, you obviously have studied thoroughly. Very musical view of things and very clear but highly personal ideas you lay down.
Now I just remain curious what you'll be occupied with next.


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 Post subject: Re: G. Catoire, Quatre Morceaux, Op. 12, No. 3, "Nocturne"
PostPosted: Sun Jun 20, 2010 9:56 pm 
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Joined: Wed Oct 24, 2007 6:02 pm
Posts: 1167
Location: Piemonte, Italy
David, congratulations also from me for nailing down your third Catoire set.

While listening to this Nocturne some thoughts spring to mind. First, I want again to learn something by Catoire! :lol:
Secondly, I noticed details that once more make me admire your musicality. In particular, the way you shape the dynamics at the beginning of the first three phrases, the three (poco) crescendo always different and progressively more expansive -and it's so convincing and fits the structure, the first phrase is an introduction, the second one is sort of a false start, in fact the Nocturne actually starts at bar 10. Finally, you do know how to make your Baldwin sing :!:

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"A conclusion is simply the place where you got tired of thinking" - Anonymous

Alfonso Bertazzi, amateur pianist.


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 Post subject: Re: G. Catoire, Quatre Morceaux, Op. 12, No. 3, "Nocturne"
PostPosted: Sun Jun 20, 2010 10:58 pm 
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Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 1999
Location: U.S.A.
Hi Pantelis,

Thanks for those congrats! I am relieved, as there were some frustrating moments when I had doubts about being able to complete Op. 12. I'm glad it ended well.

Yes, I do try to be cognizant of details. Always, before taking a score to the piano, I sit with it at my desk first to analysis the piece, specifically looking for details that will affect musicality. I also consider the techniques necessary to realize those details. It was my second teacher who brought my attention to details to a higher level, and I'm ever grateful to him for that. I believe that a successful performance always lies in those details and how they are melded into the musical line to form the whole. There's no question that it's a huge part of musicianship for all of us who play the piano.

Because we have no surviving performance practices of Catoire's works, I always try to go beyond the notation on the page and search for him between the lines of the music. And yes, sometimes I allow my own personality to add some individuality to an interpretation and rendition of any of these pieces. One listener noticed, for example, that I play the "misterioso" section of the "Etude-fantastique" differently than Koji Attwood, or that I give more prominence to some bass harmonies in this "Nocturne" than Marc Hamelin. But that's a good thing! It demonstrates that without known performance practices, these wonderful works can be interpreted in different ways.

Thanks, Pantelis, for listening and you comments too!

David

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"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


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 Post subject: Re: G. Catoire, Quatre Morceaux, Op. 12, No. 3, "Nocturne"
PostPosted: Sun Jun 20, 2010 11:33 pm 
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Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 9:48 pm
Posts: 1999
Location: U.S.A.
Hi Alfonso,

Thanks for your kind words! The introduction to the "Nocturne" is interesting too because it reappears again in the piece, instead of simply making its opening statement and retiring. This piece, I think, was the most difficult one I undertook considering all three opuses. Sometimes when I was practicing, I wasn't sure if I'd own it or it would own me. :lol: There are some things I could still improve upon, but for the moment at least, it's a fairly good rendition.

It's true that the Baldwin piano has a slightly faster tone decay than the NY Steinway (but not as notorious as found in the Yamaha). That automatically makes the Baldwin slightly more percussive than the Steinway. So it's a bit more work to make the Baldwin "sing". Once you really come to know the instrument though, shaping the phrases and nuances comes much more easily.

Thanks for listening, and I'm glad you enjoyed the piece and my playing.

David

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"Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities." David April


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