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Which one is your personal favorite?
Number 1 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
Number 2 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
Number 3 33%  33%  [ 1 ]
Number 4 33%  33%  [ 1 ]
Number 5 33%  33%  [ 1 ]
Total votes : 3
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 Post subject: Polonaise in G Minor, BWV Anh. 125 - Bach, Notebook for AMB
PostPosted: Fri Nov 06, 2009 2:29 am 
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Hello, folks, this time I am going to give you an earful.
The five renditions of this famous polonaise (even though in the Notebook for Anna Magdalena Bach, it is attributed to C. P. E. Bach) were recorded by me in five different manners. Here they are in no particular order:

- Roland's new V-Piano
- Modartt's new Pianoteq PRO 3.5
- Synthogy Ivory German D (Steinway D) Virtual Piano
- Pianissimo Virtual Piano
- My Acoustic Piano with an Edirol.

Before you ask, each recording was performed individually (not the same MIDI file playing five different times).

I have a personal favorite. Can you guess which is which? Monica, I leave it up to you to decide which one will go up on the site. I hope it is not too much work.

:-)

I had a lot of fun doing this project.



Bach - Polonaise in G minor, BWV Anh. 125


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 06, 2009 10:21 am 
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I would suggest that you decide on your optimal recording setup, and stick to that. I don't see the point of having a bunch of recordings that may all sound different.

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 06, 2009 3:12 pm 
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:-)

I agree with you partially, Chris; the reasons I did this were:

1) Fun
2) The need for some feedback on the optimal setup
3) Help people decide if they are thinking of buying a virtual/digital piano


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 06, 2009 5:09 pm 
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Yep, 3 points for you :D

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 4:13 am 
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Marcelo - I dunno....maybe if you give me a nice present I will listen to all of your recordings and then decide which one goes up. But if no present is forthcoming, then you have to pick the winner yourself! :)

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 5:31 am 
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Oh, Monica! You and all the admins deserve so much more than great gifts for all the work you put into this site.

:-)

My personal favorite recording was number 4 which was recorded on my acoustic piano. I made the whole interventional cardiology department of the hospital I work at listen to these five recordings today, but to them, they all sounded the same. :-) The other recordings are as follows:

1 - Pianoteq
2 - Pianissimo
3 - Ivory
5 - V-Piano


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 5:42 am 
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Hi marcelo,

I didn't listen to the full recordings, but enough of each to get the sound in my ear. Of the e-pianos, the one that disappointed me very surprisingly was the Roland V piano due to all of the hype surrounding it's introduction. Of the other e-pianos, I liked the sound of the Synthology best, believing it to be closest to true acoustic sound. I wish you had noted the brand/model of your acoustic piano as well. I voted in the poll.

David

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 2:27 pm 
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Ok, Marcelo - I have put up your acoustic-version. And I have an hour to kill before my class this morning so listened to all of the other version too. First off - your acoustic piano - what kind is it? (forgive me if you've told me before) It sounds a little like a pianoforte to me. Regarding these e-pianos, I think I liked the Ivory sound best. Like what David said, I'm a little surprised about the V-piano not being as good as I expected. This was a neat experiment, though. I'll leave all the files up for a while, if that's okay with you - in case others want to listen.


Also - I'm thinking that this Notebook table is getting to be quite a significant amount of works and so I'm wondering if we should perhaps take it out of the miscellaneous category and make a new and separate category for it. Chris B - this question is really for you.

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 2:32 pm 
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pianolady wrote:
Also - I'm thinking that this Notebook table is getting to be quite a significant amount of works and so I'm wondering if we should perhaps take it out of the miscellaneous category and make a new and separate category for it. Chris B - this question is really for you.

Hm.... I was sort of hoping I would be spared that. Yes it should probably be a separate page - but I am not sure if there is is consensus about what pieces are in the notebook or not. It's a Bach corner I have not explored yet.

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 4:13 pm 
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My acoustic piano is a Fritz-Dobbert C-160, a brazilian grande piano made in Sao Paulo by "Pianofatura Paulista". Supposedly the action they use is from the same maker as Steinway.

You can put the five of them up, it's ok by me.

The pieces in the 1725 notebook, which is the one I'm committed to recording are below; due to my singing limitations (:-)) I will be only recording the keyboard solo works.

What happens is that some of the pieces in the notebook also have been published elsewhere, like the french suites, the partitas, the prelude in C and the goldberg aria.

1. Keyboard partita in A minor, BWV 827. This is the third partita from Bach's set of Partitas for keyboard BWV 825–830, which was published in 1731 as the first volume of Clavier-Übung.
2. Keyboard partita in E minor, BWV 830. This is the sixth partita from Bach's set of Partitas for keyboard BWV 825–830.
3. Minuet in F major, BWV Anh. 113.
4. Minuet in G major, BWV Anh. 114. Usually attributed to Christian Petzold.
5. Minuet in G minor, BWV Anh. 115. Usually attributed to Christian Petzold.
6. Rondeau in B-flat major, BWV Anh. 183. This piece is by François Couperin and is best known under the original title: Les Bergeries.
7. Minuet in G major, BWV Anh. 116.
8a. Polonaise in F major, BWV Anh. 117a.
8b. Polonaise in F major, BWV Anh. 117b.
9. Minuet in B-flat major, BWV Anh. 118.
10. Polonaise in G minor, BWV Anh. 119.
11. Chorale prelude “Wer nur den lieben Gott läßt walten”, BWV 691.
12. Chorale setting “Gib dich zufrieden und sei stille” in F major, BWV 510.
13a. Chorale setting “Gib dich zufrieden und sei stille” in E minor, BWV 511.
13b. Chorale setting “Gib dich zufrieden und sei stille” in G minor, BWV 512.
14. Minuet in A minor, BWV Anh. 120.
15. Minuet in C minor, BWV Anh. 121.
16. March in D major, BWV Anh. 122. Usually attributed to Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach.
17. Polonaise in G minor, BWV Anh. 123. Usually attributed to Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach.
18. March in G major, BWV Anh. 124. Usually attributed to Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach.
19. Polonaise in G minor, BWV Anh. 125. Usually attributed to Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach.
20a. Aria “So oft ich meine Tobackspfeife” in D minor, BWV 515.
20b. Aria “So oft ich meine Tobackspfeife” in G minor, BWV 515a.
21. Menuet fait par Mons. Böhm, by Georg Böhm. Not included in the BWV catalogue.
22. Musette in D major, BWV Anh. 126.
23. March in E-flat major, BWV Anh. 127.
24. (Polonaise) in D minor, BWV Anh. 128.
25. Aria “Bist du bei mir”, BWV 508. This composition is probably the most well-known of the arias of the 1725 notebook. Its melody is by Gottfried Heinrich Stölzel.[4]
26. Keyboard aria in G major, BWV 988/1. Another well-known piece, this is the aria of the Goldberg Variations, BWV 988. Christoph Wolff has suggested that this Aria was entered into the two blank pages of this book by Anna Magdalena later, in 1740.
27. Solo per il cembalo in E-flat major, BWV Anh. 129. A harpsichord piece by Carl Phillip Emanuel Bach.
28. Polonaise in G major, BWV Anh. 130. Possibly composed by Johann Adolph Hasse.
29. Prelude in C major, BWV 846/1. This is the first prelude from the Well-Tempered Clavier Book 1, with bars 16–20 omitted, most likely in order to make the piece fit in two pages.
30. Keyboard suite in D minor, BWV 812. This is the first French Suite.
31. Keyboard suite in C minor, BWV 813. This is an incomplete version of the second French Suite.
32. Movement in F major, BWV Anh. 131. The handwriting looks like that of a child, and apparently the piece is an attempt to create a bass line for a given melody.
33. Aria “Warum betrübst du dich”, BWV 516.
34. Recitative “Ich habe genug” and aria “Schlummert ein, ihr matten Augen” (solo), BWV 82/2,3.
35. Chorale setting “Schaff's mit mir, Gott”, BWV 514.
36. Minuet in D minor, BWV Anh. 132.
37. Aria “Wilst du dein Herz mir schenken” (subtitled Aria di Giovannini), BWV 518.
38. Aria “Schlummert ein, ihr matten Augen”, unfinished, BWV 82/3.
39a. Chorale setting “Dir, dir Jehova, will ich singen” (version for choir), BWV 299.
39b. Chorale setting “Dir, dir Jehova, will ich singen” (solo), BWV 299.
40. Song “Wie wohl ist mir, o Freund der Seelen”, BWV 517.
41. Aria “Gedenke doch, mein Geist, zurücke”, BWV 509.
42. Chorale “O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort”, BWV 513.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 6:08 pm 
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Go ahead - give us your singing recordings too! Unless you are really terrible.... But then that may be good for a laugh!

Anyway, just to let you know, your recordings are now in a separate subcategory under Bach. Would you like to add some text to the page - something explaining the notebook in your own words?

Also - I didn't know the Goldberg Aria was also in this notebook. Interesting....

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 08, 2009 2:35 am 
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:-) I don't think my singing would evoke laughter, rather pity.

Regarding the text I'm working on it. I should have it by tomorrow. Meanwhile, There is a great image to use in the page: It's the painting "Bach with His Family at Morning Devotion", by Toby Edward Rosenthal. The painting is from 1870, and Rosenthal died in 1917, which should make the image public domain in all countries which adopt the 70-year rule, hence including the United States of America and the European Union.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 08, 2009 4:31 am 
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OK, Monica and Admins, this is a text I came up with for the Notebook Page. Feel free to edit it in any way, alter it, summarize it, expand it, paraphrase or reword it. Also I'm not sure we should include the complete listings available at the end. I'll leave it to you to decide whether to maintain them or take them away. Most of the information is from Wikipedia, and some other articles I read on the subject. The references are at the end.

In the eighteenth century, copying music was a very important part of any musician’s life. That’s why in the years of 1722 and 1725 Johann Sebastian Bach gave his second wife, Anna Magdalena, two notebooks: the first one entitled “Clavier-Büchlein vor Anna Magdalena Bach in ANNO 1722”, or “Notebook for Anna Magdalena Bach, year 1722”; and the second one, the 1725 notebook, commonly referred to as the “Anna Magdalena Notebook”.

The 1722 notebook contains mainly pieces by J.S. Bach, such as fragments of the French Suites, an air with variations and a short organ piece. Unfortunately, only 25 unbound pages of this first notebook have reached us, what amounts to about a third of its estimated original size.

The better known 1725 noteboook, more richly decorated and better bound than the first one, did reach this day in much better condition. Its fine binding work and gilt edging, strongly suggests it was a gift from J. S. Bach to his wife to celebrate a very special occasion: possibly, either her 24th birthday on September 22nd, 1725, or their wedding anniversary on December 3rd.

Anna Magdalena was very much musically inclined, and was employed as a singer at the time of their marriage. In Bach's own words, she could sing "decent soprano".

Bach copied the first two pieces on the notebook, as part of the gift for his wife: the very first one is the partita BWV 827 in A minor, or AM, which are Anna Magdalena’s innitials. The second piece is the partita in E minor, BWV 830.

The notebook also contains several dances, arias, chorales and other pieces of music by several composers, including Carl Phillip Emmanuel Bach, Christian Petzold, François Couperin, Georg Bohm and other musician friends of the Bach family. Most entries were copied by Anna Magdalena herself, but the presence of the handwritings of Johan Sebastian, Carl Phillip Emmanual and Johann Christian Bach indicates that maintaining the notebook was a family effort.

Most of the pieces are technically quite accessible, a fact which denotes an important didactical value to them. Quite possibly, these pieces were not only for musical enjoyment of the Bach family, but also for the musical education of its younger members. Bach probably knew that initiation to keyboard instrument playing would take something easier and simpler than his Inventions and Sinfonias, especially for children.

In addition to that, Anna Magdalena was known to have organized several musical gatherings at the Bach household, where visitors were encouraged to perform and also to compose new pieces for the Notebook, which were promptly copied to it.

It has recently been suggested by researchers that Anna Magdalena may have composed some pieces which bore her husband’s name, namely the six cello suites, BWV 1007-1021, and the aria from the Goldberg Variations, BWV 988, which was entered into the 1725 notebook. This claim is not universally accepted by all scholars, though.

Johann Sebastian and Anna Magdalena had a happy marriage to which their common interest in music certainly contributed. Unfortunately, after Bach’s death in 1850, their sons parted different ways due to disagreements, and Anna Magdalena became increasingly dependent on charity and government handouts. She died in 1860 and was buried in a pauper’s grave.

The complete listing of the pieces which have reached us in the 1722 and in the 1725 notebook are below:

1722 notebook:

1. Five keyboard suites. The first three are fragments of the pieces that are now known as the first three French Suites, BWV 812–814. The next two are complete suites, French Suites Nos. 4 and 5, BWV 815–816. The minuets of suites 2 and 3 are separated from the rest of their respective suites and were most probably added at a later date by Anna Magdalena Bach (they are almost certainly in her hand), some time before 1725.
2. Fantasia pro organo, unfinished, BWV 573. A short organ piece, 12 complete bars and the beginning notes of the 13th bar.
3. Air with variations in C minor, unfinished, BWV 991. The first 10 bars feature coherent two-part writing, but the remaining 35 bars only have one voice written out.
4. “Jesus, meine Zuversicht”, chorale prelude, BWV 728. A brief (9 bars) piece in three voices, features two sections with repeats for each.
5. “Minuet in G major”, BWV 841 (not to be confused with Petzold's Minuet in G Major in the 1725 notebook). A short dance with simplistic two-part writing and two sections with repeats for each.

1725 notebook:

1. Keyboard partita in A minor, BWV 827. This is the third partita from Bach's set of Partitas for keyboard BWV 825–830, which was published in 1731 as the first volume of Clavier-Übung.
2. Keyboard partita in E minor, BWV 830. This is the sixth partita from Bach's set of Partitas for keyboard BWV 825–830.
3. Minuet in F major, BWV Anh. 113.
4. Minuet in G major, BWV Anh. 114. Usually attributed to Christian Petzold.
5. Minuet in G minor, BWV Anh. 115. Usually attributed to Christian Petzold.
6. Rondeau in B-flat major, BWV Anh. 183. This piece is by François Couperin and is best known under the original title: Les Bergeries.
7. Minuet in G major, BWV Anh. 116.
8a. Polonaise in F major, BWV Anh. 117a.
8b. Polonaise in F major, BWV Anh. 117b.
9. Minuet in B-flat major, BWV Anh. 118.
10. Polonaise in G minor, BWV Anh. 119.
11. Chorale prelude “Wer nur den lieben Gott läßt walten”, BWV 691.
12. Chorale setting “Gib dich zufrieden und sei stille” in F major, BWV 510.
13a. Chorale setting “Gib dich zufrieden und sei stille” in E minor, BWV 511.
13b. Chorale setting “Gib dich zufrieden und sei stille” in G minor, BWV 512.
14. Minuet in A minor, BWV Anh. 120.
15. Minuet in C minor, BWV Anh. 121.
16. March in D major, BWV Anh. 122. Usually attributed to Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach.
17. Polonaise in G minor, BWV Anh. 123. Usually attributed to Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach.
18. March in G major, BWV Anh. 124. Usually attributed to Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach.
19. Polonaise in G minor, BWV Anh. 125. Usually attributed to Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach.
20a. Aria “So oft ich meine Tobackspfeife” in D minor, BWV 515.
20b. Aria “So oft ich meine Tobackspfeife” in G minor, BWV 515a.
21. Menuet fait par Mons. Böhm, by Georg Böhm. Not included in the BWV catalogue.
22. Musette in D major, BWV Anh. 126.
23. March in E-flat major, BWV Anh. 127.
24. (Polonaise) in D minor, BWV Anh. 128.
25. Aria “Bist du bei mir”, BWV 508. This composition is probably the most well-known of the arias of the 1725 notebook. Its melody is by Gottfried Heinrich Stölzel.[4]
26. Keyboard aria in G major, BWV 988/1. Another well-known piece, this is the aria of the Goldberg Variations, BWV 988. Christoph Wolff has suggested that this Aria was entered into the two blank pages of this book by Anna Magdalena later, in 1740.
27. Solo per il cembalo in E-flat major, BWV Anh. 129. A harpsichord piece by Carl Phillip Emanuel Bach.
28. Polonaise in G major, BWV Anh. 130. Possibly composed by Johann Adolph Hasse.
29. Prelude in C major, BWV 846/1. This is the first prelude from the Well-Tempered Clavier Book 1, with bars 16–20 omitted, most likely in order to make the piece fit in two pages.
30. Keyboard suite in D minor, BWV 812. This is the first French Suite.
31. Keyboard suite in C minor, BWV 813. This is an incomplete version of the second French Suite.
32. Movement in F major, BWV Anh. 131. The handwriting looks like that of a child, and apparently the piece is an attempt to create a bass line for a given melody.
33. Aria “Warum betrübst du dich”, BWV 516.
34. Recitative “Ich habe genug” and aria “Schlummert ein, ihr matten Augen” (solo), BWV 82/2,3.
35. Chorale setting “Schaff's mit mir, Gott”, BWV 514.
36. Minuet in D minor, BWV Anh. 132.
37. Aria “Wilst du dein Herz mir schenken” (subtitled Aria di Giovannini), BWV 518.
38. Aria “Schlummert ein, ihr matten Augen”, unfinished, BWV 82/3.
39a. Chorale setting “Dir, dir Jehova, will ich singen” (version for choir), BWV 299.
39b. Chorale setting “Dir, dir Jehova, will ich singen” (solo), BWV 299.
40. Song “Wie wohl ist mir, o Freund der Seelen”, BWV 517.
41. Aria “Gedenke doch, mein Geist, zurücke”, BWV 509.
42. Chorale “O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort”, BWV 513.

References:
1. Wikipedia. Anna Magdalena Bach. November 7, 2009. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anna_Magdalena_Bach
2. Wikipedia. Notebook for Anna Magdalea Bach. November 7, 2009. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Notebook_f ... alena_bach
3. Palmer, Willard A. (Editor). J. S. Bach - Selections from Anna Magdalena's Notebook. Second Edition, 1992 - Alfred Publishing Co., Inc. p. 1
4. Heinemann, Ernst-Günter (Editor). J. S. Bach. Notenbüchlein für Anna Magdalena Bach. Urtext Edition. G. Henle Verlag. G Henle USA Inc., St. Louis, MO, pages V-VI
5. Johann Sebastian Bach. Notebook for Anna Magdalena Bach. Kalmus Edition. Van Nuys, California, Alfred Publishing |Co., Inc., pages 3-7
6. Rossi, Nino (Editor). BACH - 14 peças fáceis do livro de "Ana Magdalena Bach". São Paulo, Ricordi Brasileira S.A. - Editores. p. 2


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 08, 2009 5:32 am 
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Fantastic! That's great, Marcelo. I love the painting. But where are the twenty one children? (you know that joke about his organ? lol)

couple things: I put up your complete article (took out only one comma). The page is rather long now, but it's okay with me if it's okay with you. I think having a lot of information is good. And holy moly - Anna Magdenlena wrote the Aria in the Goldberg Variations? That blows me away. I'm going to have to one day dig more deeply into her biography - a pauper's grave - poor woman - that breaks my heart.

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"Simplicity is the highest goal, achievable when you have overcome all difficulties." ~ Frederic Chopin

my videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/monicapiano
my personal website: http://www.monicaalianello.com


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 08, 2009 5:58 am 
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To me the page looks good. I just spotted a mistake that escaped my first proofreading and I know it's going to bug me forever if it doesn't get corrected.

The Cello suites are numbered BWV 1007-1012, not 1007-1021 (9th paragraph).

Thank you!

:-)


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