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 Post subject: Re: Menino de Ouro, Brazilian tango
PostPosted: Mon Nov 23, 2009 8:54 pm 
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Joined: Tue Feb 06, 2007 7:59 pm
Posts: 322
Location: toronto
This is really nice Lisztzsil,

And thank you for introducing me to this composer. Somehow I did not know much about Nazareth.

My parents really like Tango's so I suspect I will need to take a closer look at his work.

lisztzsil wrote:
Hi folks,
Here's the 55th Nazareth: Menino de Ouro (Golden boy). It's one of his nice works, which shows what he did best (Brazilian tangos).

Best regards,
Alexandre


Nazareth - Menino de Ouro (Golden Boy)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 27, 2009 11:27 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2007 3:13 pm
Posts: 218
Location: Brazil
Thank you s_winitsky,
You're being introduced to his lesser known works, which is something interesting, to my view.
If you want to know his most famous works, check out: Odeon, Brejeiro, Apanhei-te Cavaquinho, Escorregando, Fon-Fon, Dengozo and Confidências.


Mônica and Chris, you're right, many composers are famous for writing lighthearted music during hard times (Joplin was another example).

Best wishes,
Alexandre


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 28, 2009 12:03 am 
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Joined: Sat May 17, 2008 4:43 pm
Posts: 916
Location: Brazil
I like "Apanhei-te cavaquinho" :D

well played, it makes the piano sounds like a real "cavaquinho", which is the instrument below:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cavaquinho

PS: I played the "cavaquinho" long ago... but I didn't like it, so I forgot everything.

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Felipe Sarro


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 Post subject: 1922, Brazilian tango
PostPosted: Sun Nov 29, 2009 8:05 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2007 3:13 pm
Posts: 218
Location: Brazil
Hi Folks,
Today I've recorded one of his compositions for the Carnaval. It's called 1922, composed for the Carnaval of that year. It was originally subtitled as a Samba in the manuscript, but changed to "Brazilian tango" when published. It has never been recorded commercially.

Best wishes,
Alexandre


Nazareth - 1922 (Brazilian tango)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 30, 2009 5:21 am 
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Cute piece! This is up, Alexandre.

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"Simplicity is the highest goal, achievable when you have overcome all difficulties." ~ Frederic Chopin

my videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/monicapiano


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 Post subject: Eulina, polka
PostPosted: Sun Dec 06, 2009 6:41 am 
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Posts: 218
Location: Brazil
Dear folks,
Here's the 57th rare Nazareth, a polca he dedicated to his daughter Eulina in 1893. It sounds rather like a lullaby, for it was written when Eulina was just a child.

It has never been recorded commercially.

Best wishes,
Alexandre

Nazareth - Eulina (Polka)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 09, 2009 2:02 pm 
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Sorry for the delay; this one almost slipped passed me. It's up now, and nice job as usual, Alexandre.

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"Simplicity is the highest goal, achievable when you have overcome all difficulties." ~ Frederic Chopin

my videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/monicapiano


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 09, 2009 2:44 pm 
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Posts: 218
Location: Brazil
Thanks, Monica.

Cheers,
Alexandre


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 09, 2009 5:12 pm 
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Location: Netherlands
Very pretty indeed, if IMO a bit too long for its musical content. Great playing as ever.

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Nothing is always absolutely so -- Sturgeon's law
Chris Breemer


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 09, 2009 5:57 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2007 3:13 pm
Posts: 218
Location: Brazil
Thanks, Chris.
The recording got too long because I decided to play the form ABACABA instead of plain ABACA. The first form is written down in most of his Brazilian tangos, and Nazareth himself recorded this form when playing some of his tangos. But I'm still deciding what to do in this matter.

Cheers,
Alexandre


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 14, 2009 6:13 pm 
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Posts: 218
Location: Brazil
Hello folks,
Today I've recorded one of Nazareth's Schottisches: Gentil ("gentle"). It's a rather simple piece, full of tiptoeness. This musical gender was common in Brazil during the Belle Époque (transition between the 19th and 20th centuries), and it's sort of a slow polca.

Best wishes,
Alexandre

Nazareth - Gentil


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 15, 2009 1:52 pm 
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This one is up, Alexandre. Sounded nice. Also, what is a Schottische?

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"Simplicity is the highest goal, achievable when you have overcome all difficulties." ~ Frederic Chopin

my videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/monicapiano


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 16, 2009 1:15 am 
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Location: Brazil
Hi Monica, the Schottisch is a kind of slow polka, danced in pairs, and it arrived in Brazil in the late 19th century, brought by the Portuguese. Here in northeastern Brazil it evolved in a very unique way, culminating in today's xótis and forrós, whose most prominent author is Luiz Gonzaga. However, when Nazareth composed his Schottishes, the dance was more closely associated to the European tradition, although it was already a genre with Brazilian identities (many Brazilian composers of the period composed Schottisches, most notably Anacleto de Medeiros).

Wikipedia has a very interesting article on the genre, and through it I've learned that it spread from Bohemia to many countries, including Europe and America. It also says that it's one of Spain's most typical dances.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schottische

Albeit the name, apparently it doesn't have relation with Scotland.

Cheers,
Alexandre


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 16, 2009 2:48 am 
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Hi Alexandre and thanks for the explanation. Although I find something funny in that Wiki article - it's this sentence:

Despite the name, this dance has no direct relation with Scotland. The word Schottische is from Germany , not Scotland (the Germans referred to it as Schottische, which means Scottish, for some reason).

:lol:

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"Simplicity is the highest goal, achievable when you have overcome all difficulties." ~ Frederic Chopin

my videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/monicapiano


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 16, 2009 2:52 am 
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Posts: 218
Location: Brazil
Yes, that's a bit incoherent and requires further diggin'!


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