Piano Society
Free Classical Keyboard Recordings
It is currently Mon Oct 20, 2014 2:27 pm

All times are UTC - 1 hour




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 40 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2008 2:08 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Nov 21, 2007 6:20 pm
Posts: 18
Location: North Carolina, USA
I don't know if anyone has mentioned this in this long thread, but if I concentrate on the music and communicating the music to others, then the music is not about myself, but about the music, and my nervousness dwindles. Of course, there is excitement, but that can be helpful in doing one's best for the music. So I guess what I mean here is that if I don't focus on what others think of me and my playing, but on the music itself and my desire to express it, then whatever nervousness remains can be applied to the intensity of expressing the music.
I used to play a lot at an assisted living where the folks didn't care about a few mistakes. They were just so delighted to have live music that they were listening intently to whatever I could express through it. Also, it helps to have the notes in front of me instead of relying on my memory. Of course, I could intend to play from memory but the music was there in case I forgot or got distracted.
Mozartiana


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: how not to be frighten onstage
PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 12:59 pm 
Stephen Farrugia wrote:
hello everybody

can you tell me how can i not be frightened on stage in a performance but be relax?


Maybe you should read this book once :?: :
The Inner Game of Music by Barry Green and W. Timothy Gallwey


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 6:45 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 03, 2007 7:27 pm
Posts: 194
Quote:
Maybe you should read this book once :
The Inner Game of Music by Barry Green and W. Timothy Gallwey


This book is one of the best I have ever read. Within one day of reading a few chapters
it had actually helped me tackle my AADD when playing, seriously helped to quiet all the
distractions in my head when trying to concentrate on music. It is also a very easy read.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 10:10 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jun 27, 2006 6:12 pm
Posts: 13
The more fear you successfully overcome the more exhilarating your performance will be. You will never eliminate fear before a performance and you shouldn't. Instead, talk to yourself beforehand and build up your confidence/passion/willpower/intensity until it outweighs the fear you feel.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 14, 2008 3:33 pm 
ben wrote:
You will never eliminate fear before a performance and you shouldn't.


:?: I have never really been frightened on stage. Actually I feel more frightened without the stage and especially if there is just one person listening and if this person knows a lot about music. I know you will think that's really weird, but it's true... So I'm weird. :P

ben wrote:
Instead, talk to yourself beforehand and build up your confidence/passion/willpower/intensity until it outweighs the fear you feel.


:wink: Just concentrate, hear the beautiful music you will play... I you start playing after that, you won't even see the audience, it's just you and your music...


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:21 am 
Eating bananas?? haha. :D

hi, people. im new here =D


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:37 am 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Mon Jun 12, 2006 11:45 am
Posts: 9570
Location: Netherlands
abimopectore wrote:
:?: I have never really been frightened on stage. Actually I feel more frightened without the stage and especially if there is just one person listening and if this person knows a lot about music. I know you will think that's really weird, but it's true... So I'm weird. :P

Not sure if you're weird, but you've got a point there. If you play for multiple persons, they are likely to applaud even if you made mistakes. If you play for one, (s)he's likely to tell you what you did wrong or could have done better :wink:

_________________
Nothing is always absolutely so -- Sturgeon's law
Chris Breemer


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:36 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2006 12:34 pm
Posts: 1278
I get afraid about three months before a recital (right about now). I'm performing Beethoven Sonatas 12, 13 and 14 in May and I'm petrified. (Because #12 and #13 are a mess and I can't see the way out of it.)

I'll get over it.

I guess I'm in the habit of being genuinely frightened far in advance (not in the "my house is on fire" sort of way but in the "oh my God, we're moving to another country next month" kind of way) so that by the time a recital comes around, I'm just too damned tired to care.

Oh my achin' back!
:lol:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 8:13 pm 
Ever notice how children playing don't seem to be phased by the audience? They are just doing it without any expectation weighing on them, even when a mistake is made, they back up a bar and repeat and keep going.

As adults, we feel that world is watching and judging, and by now we should be perfect, and if not, we have wasted ours and everyones time all these years. When we practice, we play invincibly, and always think what if they could see me now?

Its a challenge to put yourself back into a child-like mentality and have a care-free attitude about your playing for others. You have to really reach and look at the big picture of what's going on. Your piano playing for an audience is not the beginning nor the end of the world. You have to almost pretend you are just sitting down for a practice, be loose and relaxed, make a quick wink at the audience to create the connection, and they will feel relaxed with you. Even crack a quick comment if the occassion allows. This is a big ice breaker out of an otherwise stiff and overly proper profession.

I get nervous watching ice skaters, because i KNOW they will fall on a triple loop during the program, and I wonder what are they thinking now? I've blown it? They are all laughing? No. The crowd understands, they appreciate all the work and practice, and will still applaud the effort. Just keep smiling.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 07, 2008 11:49 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jul 03, 2008 11:48 pm
Posts: 15
Location: Minnesota, United States
A few points I keep in mind for performances:

1. Expect to make a mistake - and forgive yourself for it! If you're thinking about the past mistake, you're going to make more!

2. The more you do it......

3. BREATH! Oxygen in your body can help control finger trembles and shakiness. Do a few stretches and deep breaths before going on.

4. In practicing - I try to be as much in my 'performance mindset' as possible; in performing - I try to be as much in my 'practice mindset' as possible! (In other words I try to play the same every time, rather practicing or performing!)

5. FOCUS on transmitting the beauty of the music to the audience - not presenting yourself.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 40 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3

All times are UTC - 1 hour


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group